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" The generall end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline... "
The Christian Observer - Page 251
1815
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Poetry, Symbol, and Allegory: Interpreting Metaphorical Language from Plato ...

Simon Brittan - Literary Criticism - 2003 - 226 pages
...of contemporary politics. But there are further designs: The generall end therefore of all the book is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline: Which for that I conceived shoulde be most plausible and pleasing, being coloured with an historicall...
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Science, Reading, and Renaissance Literature: The Art of Making Knowledge ...

Elizabeth Spiller - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 214 pages
...historical one, it does allow us to take seriously the fictive presumption that the end of the book is to "fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline." "Noble person" is perhaps a broader category than "gentleman," but it is not necessarily one that includes...
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Humanism, Machinery, and Renaissance Literature

Jessica Wolfe - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 305 pages
...mortal flesh and the debilities of a human soul, Spenser's Talus complicates The Faerie Queene's project to fashion a "gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline," for his inhuman constitution and his barbarity reveal the potentially dehumanizing effects of that...
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Shelley and the Chaos of History: A New Politics of Poetry

Hugh Roberts - Literary Criticism - 2010
...borrowed stanzaic form. The Revolt, like The Fairie Queene, is a romance.'1 Spenser writes his famous poem "to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline." Shelley writes his to "awaken the feelings, so the reader should see the beauty of true virtue, and...
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The Reign of Chivalry

Richard W. Barber - History - 2005 - 184 pages
...Walter Raleigh 'expounding his whole intention' he writes: The generall end therefore of this book is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline: Which for that I conceived 158 should be most plausible and pleasing, being coloured with an historicall...
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Spenser's Monstrous Regiment: Elizabethan Ireland and the Poetics of Difference

Richard A. McCabe - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 306 pages
...established in Ariosto and Tasso but ingeniously adapted to a crusade far closer to home. To attempt 'to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline' in an Irish context was to confront a people who were 'all Papistes by theire profession but in the...
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Religion, Allegory, and Literacy in Early Modern England, 1560-1640: The ...

John S. Pendergast - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 187 pages
...both of them defined by the court and courtly rhetoric. He writes first, 'The general end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline." Later Spenser makes it clear that the true final cause is Queen Elizabeth: "In that Faery Queene I...
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Before Intimacy: Asocial Sexuality in Early Modern England

Daniel Juan Gil - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 187 pages
...epic's prefatory letter to Sir Walter Raleigh, Spenser famously claims that "the general end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline." 1 But if The Faerie Queene is a conduct manual, then it is a very strange one for, as a genre, conduct...
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Allegory, Space and the Material World in the Writings of Edmund Spenser

Christopher Burlinson - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 256 pages
...of The Faerie Queene. Spenser declares in the letter, of course, that his 'generall end' in the book is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline: Which for that I conceiued shoulde be most plausible and pleasing, being coloured with an historicall...
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Edmund Spenser: New and Renewed Directions

J. B. Lethbridge - Literary Collections - 2006 - 385 pages
...most stunning gesture in The Faerie Queene occurs when Spenser writes that "the generall end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in virtuous and gentle discipline,"31 and then he begins that program of virtuous fashioning by saying...
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