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" The generall end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline... "
The Christian Observer - Page 251
1815
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Critical Essays on Shakespeare's A Lover's Complaint: Suffering Ecstasy

Shirley Sharon-Zisser - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 203 pages
...Spenser's Legend of Chastity, the dream of which is to fulfill the 'general! end' of The Faerie Queene: 'to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline' (Letter to Ralegh). Specifically, Shakespeare's young man appears to be modeled not only on the Marlovian...
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Shakespeare's Christianity: The Protestant and Catholic Poetics of Julius ...

E. Beatrice Batson - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 178 pages
...holy scripture as it is in classical mythology and courtly romance tradition; this book's "end ... is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline."17 Elsewhere I have shown that even the most rabid Renaissance anti-theatricalists structured...
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Renaissance Figures of Speech

Sylvia Adamson, Gavin Alexander, Katrin Ettenhuber - History - 2007 - 306 pages
...understood. In his outline of the work, the 'Letter to Ralegh', he explains that 'The generall end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline.' 35 He does this by presenting exemplary characters, like Britomart, Calidore, and the other knights;...
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The Myth of Sisyphus: Renaissance Theories of Human Perfectibility

Elliott M. Simon - History - 2007 - 614 pages
...creative action rather than temporal achievement. Spenser's poetic vision of human perfectibility, "to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline," is based on an imaginative series of reconstructions of the myth of Sisyphus and its archetypal idealization...
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The Poetry of Praise

J. A. Burrow - Literary Criticism - 2008
...been surprised, I think, to read what Spenser said to Raleigh about his chief intention in the poem: 'to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline' by exemplifying 'the twelve private morall vertues, as Aristotle hath devised'. Insofar as the Faerie...
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