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" The generall end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline... "
The Christian Observer - Page 251
1815
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Woods Lanyer: Woman Poet C

Susanne Woods - Biography & Autobiography - 1999 - 198 pages
...blazing and defining the national virtue. Spenser declares the "general! end" of The Faerie Queene to be "to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline," with "noble person" gender neutral. ("A Letter of the Authors ... to ... Sir Walter Ralegh" [usually...
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A Companion to English Renaissance Literature and Culture

Michael Hattaway - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 786 pages
...the manner of the humanist education-of-princes tradition: The generall end therefore of all the book is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline: Which for that I conceived should be most plausible and pleasing, being coloured with an historicall...
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Defending Literature in Early Modern England: Renaissance Literary Theory in ...

Robert Matz - Literary Criticism - 2000 - 188 pages
...The poet as Medina The "generall end" of The Faerie Queene, Spenser writes in the letter to Ralegh, is to "fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline."1 Given the multiple definitions of aristocratic conduct available to Spenser, however,...
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Spenser's Supreme Fiction: Platonic Natural Philosophy and The Faerie Queene

Jon A. Quitslund - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 373 pages
...next chapter and subsequently. chapter three The Poet as Magus and Viator 'The generall end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline.' In this familiar statement and throughout 'A Letter of the Authors,' the poet emphasizes that his subject...
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Renaissance and Reformation, 1500-1620: A Biographical Dictionary

Jo Eldridge Carney - Biography & Autobiography - 2001 - 417 pages
...elements receive fullest expression in the complicated allegory of The Fairie Queene, whose purpose "is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline," according to the letter to Raleigh. Each of the six books portrays the growth of a Christian Knight...
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Eating Their Words: Cannibalism and the Boundaries of Cultural Identity

Kristen Guest - Social Science - 2001 - 219 pages
...that destruction, Spenser thus found an ideal metaphor for the total renunciation of lust necessary "to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline." NOTES 1. Faerie Queene quotations come from AC Hamilton's edition (London: Longman, 1977). 2. Waldo...
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Paradigms Found: Feminist, Gay, and New Historicist Readings of Shakespeare

Pilar Hidalgo - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 162 pages
...his study (in a letter to Sir Walter Ralegh, Spenser had defined the purpose of The Fairie Queene as "to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline") (l69). Given the complexity and scope of Spenser's work, the critic selects one episode (the destruction...
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The Cambridge Companion to Spenser

Professor of English Andrew Hadfield, Andrew Hadfield, Hadfield Andrew - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 278 pages
...and stature. In The Faerie Queene he presumes to school the community of his social superiors in how 'to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline' ('A Letter of the Authors'), but Spenser himself came from modest, non-gentle stock. His Westminster...
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Enabling Engagements: Edmund Spenser and the Poetics of Patronage

Judith Owens - Poetry - 2002 - 183 pages
..."lewd deeds." What must be especially galling, given that Spenser's avowed aim in The Faerie Queene is to "fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline" (Letter to Ralegh, 737), is the bardic appropriation of "praises which are proper unto virtue itself."...
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Philaster: Or, Love Lies A-Bleeding by Beaumont and Fletcher

Francis Beaumont, John Fletcher - Literary Criticism - 2003 - 142 pages
...the problem of what course 1 In the letter to Raleigh explaining the plan of his book Spenser wrote: 'The general! end ... of all the booke is to fashion...or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline. . . I labour to pourtraict in Arthure, before he was king, the image of a brave knight, perfected in...
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