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" The generall end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline... "
The Christian Observer - Page 251
1815
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The Life and Times of Aodh O'Neill, Prince of Ulster, Called by the English ...

John Mitchel - Ireland - 1845 - 252 pages
...famished nation, he began inditing that solemn and tender strain, the intent of which he has informed us is " to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline," — nay, he drew inspiration from the hideous Golgotha that lay around him ; and when his Merlin tells...
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The Works of Edmund Spenser: With a Selection of Notes from Various ...

Edmund Spenser - 1850 - 562 pages
...expressing of any particular purposes, or by-accidents, therein occasioned. The general end therefore e : which for that I concerned shoulde be most plausible and pleasing, being coloured with an historical...
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Chambers's Repository of Instructive and Amusing Tracts, Volume 3

1854
...oopy, when the first three books were printed in 1589, the poet says : ' The general end, therefore, of all the booke, is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline ; which for that I conceived shoulde be most plausible and pleasing, being coloured with an historical...
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The Works of Edmund Spenser: With Observations on His Life and Writings

Edmund Spenser - 1857 - 549 pages
...expressing of any canicular purposes, or by-accirfenis, therein occasioned. The general end, therefore, of all the booke, is to fashion a gentleman or *noble person in rertuous and gentle discipline ; which for that I conceived shun Ide be most plausible and pleasing,...
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The Faerie Queene: Disposed Into Twelve Bookes Fashioning XII Morall Vertues

Edmund Spenser - 1859 - 820 pages
...expressing of any particular purposes, or by-accidents, therein occasioned. The general end, therefore, of all the booke, is to fashion a \~ gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle, disri- L plme; which for that I conceived shoulde be most plausible /U and pleasing, bcing^polourcd...
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A manual of English literature

Thomas Arnold - 1862
...Walter Raleigh, which is generally prefixed to the work, the author has explained his plan : — " The general end of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman...or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline ; which for that I conceived shoulde be most plausible and pleasing, being coloured with an historical...
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Book I-II of the Faery Queene, Volume 1

Edmund Spenser - 1867
...expressing of any particular purposes, or by-accidents, therein occasioned. The generall end, therefore, of all the booke, is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline : which for that I conceived shoulde be most plausible and pleasing, being coloured with an historical...
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Spenser. Book i of The faery queene, ed. by G.W. Kitchin

Edmund Spenser - 1867
...expressing of any particular purposes, or by-accidents, therein occasioned. The generall end, therefore, of all the booke, is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline: which for that I conceived shoulde be most plausible and pleasing, being coloured with an historical...
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The Life and Times of Aodh O'Neill, Prince of Ulster: Called by the English ...

John Mitchel - Tyrone's Rebellion, 1597-1603 - 1868 - 246 pages
...famished nation, he began inditing that solemn and tender strain, the intent of which he has informed us is "to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline," — nay, he drew inspiration from the hideous Golgotha that lay around him ; and when his Merlin teUs...
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Book I of The Faery Queene

Edmund Spenser - 1869 - 251 pages
...expressing of any particular purposes, or by-accidents therein occasioned. The generall end therefore of all the booke, is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline. Which for that I conceived shoulde be most plausible and pleasing, beeing coloured with an historicall...
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