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" And let those, that play your clowns, speak no more than is set down for them : for there be of them, that will themselves laugh, to set on some quantity of barren spectators to laugh too ; though, in the mean time, some necessary question of the play... "
The Monthly Magazine - Page 27
1812
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The Works of William Shakespeare: In Nine Volumes, Volume 8

William Shakespeare - 1812
...censure which he is about to utter. Any gross or implicate lar.guajre was called prtfotu. JOHNSON. laugh, to set on some quantity of barren spectators to laugh too ; though, in the mean time, some necessary question of the play be then to be considered : that's villainous ; and shows a most pitiful...
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The Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 8

William Shakespeare - 1812
...censure which he is ai'out to utter- Any gross or indelicate Ianguag" wns called profane. JOHNSON. laugh, to set on some quantity of barren spectators to laugh too ; though, in the mean time, some necessary question of the play be then to be considered : that's villainous ; and shows a most pitiful...
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Discoveries in Hieroglyphics and Other Antiquities, Volume 2

Robert Deverell - 1813
...let those that play your clowns, speak no more than is set down for them : for there be of them that will themselves laugh, to set on some quantity of...spectators to laugh too ; though, in the mean time, some necessary question of the play be then to be considered. That's villainous ; and shews a most pitiful...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: In Twenty-one Volumes, with the ..., Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1813
...that play your clowns, speak no more than is set down for them ; for there be of them, that will of themselves laugh, to set on some quantity of barren...spectators to laugh too ; though in the mean time some necessary question of tlie play be then to be considered" This practice was undoubtedly coeval with...
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Old English plays [ed. by C. W. Dilke].

English plays - 1815
...unseemly interference will perhaps remind the reader of the Clowns spoken of l,\ Shukspeare, who " will themselves laugh to set on some quantity of barren spectators to laugh too; though in the meantime some necessary question of the play be then to be considered." Bon. Passing thousands, I will...
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The Thracian wonder

Charles Wentworth Dilke - English drama - 1816
...and unseemly interference will perhaps remind the reader of the Clowns spoken of by Shakspeare, who " will themselves laugh to set on some quantity of barren spectators to laugh too; though in the meantime some necessary question of the play be then to be considered." Bon. Passing thousands, I will...
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The Tatler; corrected from the originals, with a preface ..., Volume 1

Alexander Chalmers - 1817
...let those that play your clowns, speak no more than is set down for them: for there be of them, that will themselves laugh, to set on some quantity of...spectators to laugh too; though in the mean time, some necessary question of the play be then to be considered: that's villainous, and shows a most pitiful...
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The Family Shakspeare: In Ten Volumes; in which Nothing is Added ..., Volume 10

William Shakespeare - 1818
...let those, that play your clowns, speak no more than is set down for them: for there be of them, that will themselves laugh, to set on some quantity of...spectators to laugh too ; though, in the mean time, some necessary question of the play be then to be considered : that 's villainous ; and shows a most pitiful...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: With the Corrections ..., Volume 10

William Shakespeare - 1818
...those, that play your clowns, speak no more than is set down for them : 8 for there be of them, that will themselves laugh, to set on some quantity of barren spectators to laugh too ; In our early playhouses, the pit.had neither floor nor benches. Hence the term of groundlings for...
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The American Orator, Or, Elegant Extracts in Prose and Poetry: Comprehending ...

Increase Cooke - American literature - 1819 - 408 pages
...let those that play your clowns, speak no more than is set down for them : for there be of them that will themselves laugh, to set on some quantity of...spectators to laugh too : though in the mean time, some necessary part of the play be then to be considered. That's villainous, and shows a most pitiful ambition...
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