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" GOD ALMIGHTY first planted a garden. And indeed it is the purest of human pleasures. It is the greatest refreshment to the spirits of man; without which buildings and palaces are but gross... "
The Critical Review: Or, Annals of Literature - Page 141
1805
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The Essays Or Counsels, Moral, Economical and Political: With Elegant ...

Francis Bacon - Conduct of life - 1818 - 290 pages
...palaces are but gross handyworks. And a man shall ever see, that when ages grow to civility and elegancy, men come to build stately, sooner than to garden finely : as if gardening were the greater perfection. I do hold it in the royal ordering of Gardens, there ought to be Gardens...
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Sylva sylvarum (century IX-X) Physiological remains. Medical remains ...

Francis Bacon - Philosophy - 1819
...are but gross handy-works : and a man shall ever see, that when ages grow to civility and elegancy, men come to build stately, sooner than to garden finely ; as if gardening were the greater perfection. I do hold it, in the royal ordering of gardens, there ought to be gardens...
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Essays by Lords Bacon and Clarendon: Two Volumes in One, Volumes 1-2

Francis Bacon - English essays - 1820 - 539 pages
...are but gross handy-works: and a man shall ever see, that, when ages grow to civility and elegancy, men come to build stately, sooner than to garden finely; as if gardening were the greater perfection. 1 do hold it, in the royal ordering of gardens, there ought to be gardens...
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The Eclectic Review, Volume 15; Volume 33

Samuel Greatheed, Daniel Parken, Theophilus Williams, Josiah Conder, Thomas Price, Jonathan Edwards Ryland, Edwin Paxton Hood - English literature - 1821
...are but gross handy works: and aman shall ever see, that, when ages grow to civility and elegancy, men come to build stately, sooner than to garden finely ; as if gardening were the greater perfection. -And because the breath of flowers is far sweeter in the air, (where it...
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The British Prose Writers, Volume 1

British prose literature - 1821
...are but gross handyworks : and a man shall ever see, that, when ages grow to civility and elegancy, men come to build stately, sooner than to garden finely ; as if gardening were the greater perfection. I do hold it, in the royal ordering of gardens, there ought to be gardens...
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New Monthly Magazine, Volume 2

1821
...of Bacon, let us not omit to record his assertion, that " when ages grow to civility and elegancy, men come to build stately, sooner than to garden finely ; as if gardening were the greater perfection :" a remark no less honourable to the noble science of horticulture, than...
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The New Monthly Magazine and Literary Journal, Volume 2

English literature - 1821
...of Bacon, let us not omit to record his assertion, that " when ages grow to civility and elegancy, men come to build stately, sooner than to garden finely ; as if gardening were the greater perfection :" a remark no less honourable to the noble science of horticulture, than...
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The New Monthly Magazine, Volume 2

1822
...of Bacon, let us not omit to record his assertion, that " when ages grow to civility and elegancy, men come to build stately, sooner than to garden finely; as if gardening were the greater perfection:" a remark no less honourable to the noble science of horticulture, than...
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The Works of Alexander Pope, Volume 8

Alexander Pope - 1822
...of this art," Lord Bacon says, " a man shall ever see, that when ages grow to civility and elegancy, men come to build stately, sooner than to garden finely ; as if gardening were the greater perfection." forms; and in the ceiling is a star of the same material, at which when...
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The Works of Alexander Pope, Volume 8

Alexander Pope - Poets, English - 1822
...of this art," Lord Bacon says, " a man shall ever see, that when ages grow to civility and elegancy, men come to build stately, sooner than to garden finely ; as if gardening were the greater perfection." forms; and in the ceiling is a star of the same material, at which when...
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