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" The bell strikes one. We take no note of time, But from its loss. To give it then a tongue Is wise in man. As if an angel spoke, I feel the solemn sound. If heard aright, It is the, knell of my departed hours : Where are they? "
The Guardian - Page 45
1859
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The Microcosm: Or, Little World of Home, Volumes 1-3

1835
...wander among the wrecks and monuments of Tune — toread the epitaphs of hours and learn the moral. " We take no note of Time But from its loss — to give it then a tongue In man, is wiee." Each moment is a warning orator. It is profitable and even necessary to pause in...
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Violet; or, The danseuse [by M.D. Malet].

lady Marianne Dora Malet - 1836
...and Violet Woodville was able to number by years her absence from her own country. CHAPTER XVII. " We take no note of time, But from its loss— to give it then a tongue Is wise in man." MY readers must suppose a few years to have elapsed since the events we last recorded; and allow me...
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The Cyclopedia of Oratory: A Handbook of Authorities on Oratory as an Art ...

W. V. Byars - 1901 - 557 pages
...furnish forth the marriage tables. —Shakespeare: ' Hamlet, * Act I. ПМЕ The bell strikes one. We take no note of time But from its loss. To give it then a tongue Is wise in man. — Young: 'Night Thoughts.' We see Time's furrows on another's brow, And death intrench'd, preparing...
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Chambers's Cyclopaedia of English Literature: A History Critical and ...

Robert Chambers - American literature - 1902
...waft a feather, or to drown a fly. (From Till Camflaiitl— Night I.) On Time. The bell strikes one. We take no note of time But from its loss : to give...knell of my departed hours. Where are they ? With the years beyond the flood. It is the signal that demands dispatch : How much is to be done ? My hopes...
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Chamber's Cyclopędia of English Literature, Volume 2

Robert Chambers - American literature - 1902
...waft a feather, or to drown a fly. (From The Cotnplaint — Night I.) On Time. The bell strikes one. dored before, as great and magnificent, is obliterated...the whole earth. Where are now the great empires the years beyond the flood. It is the signal that demands dispatch : How much is to be done? My hopes...
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Elementary Guide to Literary Criticism

Franklin Verzelius Newton Painter - Criticism - 1903 - 195 pages
...the striking of a deep-toned bell. Naturally he thinks of the flight of time. " The bell strikes one. We take no note of time But from its loss : to give...heard aright, It is the knell of my departed hours." A meditation may, as a conclusion, impart a satisfying completeness to a piece. Nothing could be finer,...
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Useful Instruction (In Matters Religious, Moral and Other.)

Motilal M. Munshi - 1904
...enemies, but he that has made it his enemy, will have little to hope from his friends. — COLTON. We take no note of time But from its loss. To give...knell of my departed hours : Where are they? With the years beyond the flood. It is the signal that demands despatch: How much is to be done? My hopes...
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The World's Best Poetry ...

John Vance Cheney, Sir Charles George Douglas Roberts, Charles Francis Richardson, Francis Hovey Stoddard, John Raymond Howard - English poetry - 1904
...POEMS OF SENTIMENT. I. TIME. TIME THE SUPREME. FROM " NI3HT THOUGHTS," NIGHT I. THE bell strikes one : we take no note of time, But from its loss. To give...knell of my departed hours : Where are they ? With the years beyond the flood. It is the signal that demands despatch ; How much is to be done ! my hopes...
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The Elements of English Grammar

William Franklin Watson - 1904 - 218 pages
...the divinest thing on earth. 12. Winter lingering chills the lap of May. 13. The bell strikes one. We take no note of time But from its loss. To give it, then, a tongue Is wise in man. 14. Old friends are best. King James used to call for his old shoes. They were easiest to his feet....
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Elements of English Grammar

William Franklin Webster, Alice Woodworth Cooley - English language - 1904 - 223 pages
...the divinest thing on earth. , 12. Winter lingering chills the lap of May. 13. The hell strikes one. We take no note of time But from its loss. To give it, then, a tongue Is wise in man. 14. Old friends are best. King James used to call for his old shoes. They were easiest to his feet....
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