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" And so I was, which plainly signified That I should snarl, and bite, and play the dog. Then, since the heavens have shap'd my body so, Let hell make crook'd my mind to answer it. I have no brother, I am like no brother; And this word 'love,' which greybeards... "
The Plays of Shakspeare: Printed from the Text of Samuel Johnson, George ... - Page 337
by William Shakespeare - 1807
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The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare on Film

Russell Jackson, Russell Bennett Jackson - Literary Criticism - 2000 - 342 pages
...again'), some of Garrick's structural improvements and segments of Richard's speeches from ? Henry IV ('Clarence beware. Thou keep'st me from the light; / But I will sort a pitchy day for thee': 5.7.85-6) and parts of the long speech beginning at 3. 2. 124. Olivier's choice is shrewd here, because...
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Shakespeare: la invención de lo humano

Harold Bloom - Characters and characteristics in literature - 2001 - 734 pages
...with teeth!' / And so I was, which plainly signified /That I should snarl and hite and play the dog. /Then, since the heavens have shap'd my body so, /...but I will sort a pitchy day for thee; / For I will buzz abroad such prophecies / That Edward shall be fearful of his life; / And then, to purge his fear,...
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The Plays of Shakespeare: A Thematic Guide

Victor L. Cahn - Drama - 2001 - 361 pages
...thither — " [V, vi, 67]) and clearing another obstacle for himself in his plan to capture the throne: Then since the heavens have shap'd my body so, Let...like one another, And not in me; I am myself alone. (V, vi, 78-83) His pleasure in his own perversity is irresistible. He truly comes into his own, however,...
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The Tragedy of Richard III, with the Landing of Earle Richmond, and the ...

William Shakespeare - 2001 - 500 pages
...quoted) his own person. He is never sincere and truly in earnest but when he is about to commit a murder. 'Then, since the heavens have shap'd my body so, Let Hell make crook'd my mind to answer it. ' This is his introduction to the reader; and in his last scene he indulges the bitterness of his soul...
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Lectures on Shakespeare

W. H. Auden - Drama - 2002 - 398 pages
...In the same soliloquy, he also says that he has "neither pity, love, nor fear," and proclaims that I have no brother, I am like no brother; And this...like one another, And not in me! I am myself alone. (Pt.3, V.vi.68, 80-83) Richard also has a much longer soliloquy in the earlier scene of Edward's wooing...
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The Time is Out of Joint: Shakespeare as Philosopher of History

Agnes Heller - Fiction - 2002 - 375 pages
...neither pity, love, nor fear . . . since the heavens have shaped my body so, / Let hell make crooked my mind to answer it. . . . / I have no brother, /.../ Be resident in men like one another / And not in me-I am myself alone" (68— 84). This is what I have already indicated: Richard's personality undergoes...
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Tyranny in Shakespeare

Mary Ann McGrail - Drama - 2002 - 180 pages
...of his birth: And so I was, which plainly signified That I should snarl, and bite, and play the dog. Then since the heavens have shap'd my body so, Let...answer it. I have no brother, I am like no brother. (V.vi.71-80) But can one be revenged on nature from within nature? Richard wants both to discover that...
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William Shakespeare: The Complete Works

William Shakespeare - Literary Collections - 1989 - 1280 pages
...snarl, and bite, and play the dog. Then, since the heavens have shaped my body so, Let hell make crookt his is a Montague, our foe; A villain, that is hither...come in spite, To scorn at our solemnity this night. Be resident in men like one another, And not in me: I am myself alone. — Clarence, beware; thou keep'st...
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Shakespeare's Serial History Plays

Nicholas Grene, Professor of English Literature Nicholas Grene - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 278 pages
...bring about the downfall and death of Clarence are, as far as he is concerned, mere black propaganda: Clarence, beware: thou keep'st me from the light; But I will sort a pitchy day for thee, For I will buzz abroad such prophecies That Edward shall be fearful of his life And then, to purge his fear, I'll...
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The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare's History Plays

Cambridge University Press - Drama - 2002 - 283 pages
...l had no father, I am like no father; I have no brother, I am like no brother; And this word Move', which greybeards call divine, Be resident in men like one another And not in me: I am myself alone. (5.7.79-85) The audience knows that Richard does resemble his father and once loved him deeply, yet...
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