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" Wordsworth, on the other hand, was to propose to himself as his object, to give the charm of novelty to things of every day, and to excite a feeling analogous to the supernatural, by awakening the mind's attention from the lethargy of custom, and directing... "
Blackwood's Magazine - Page 535
1834
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The Cambridge History of Literary Criticism: Volume 5, Romanticism

George Alexander Kennedy, Marshall Brown, Glyn P. Norton, H. B. Nisbet, Alastair J. Minnis, Ian Johnson, Claude Rawson, Christa Knellwolf, A. Walton Litz, Louis Menand, Raman Selden, Rafey Habib, Lawrence Rainey, Christopher Norris, Christa Knellwolf King - Literary Criticism - 1989 - 506 pages
...poetic faith. Wordsworth's task was 'to excite a feeling analogous to the supernatural': Mr Wordsworth, on the other hand, was to propose to himself as his...the mind's attention from the lethargy of custom and directing it to the loveliness and the wonders of the world before us; an inexhaustible treasure, but...
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Sources of the Self: The Making of the Modern Identity

Charles Taylor - Philosophy - 1992 - 601 pages
...of nature"; Poetical Works, II, 386-387. Coleridge described his purpose thus: "Mr Wordsworth . . . was to propose to himself as his object to give the charm of novelty to things of everyday, and to excite a feeling analogous to the supernatural, by awakening the mind's attention...
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Strange Power of Speech: Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Literary Possession

Susan Eilenberg - Literary Criticism - 1992 - 302 pages
...that willing suspension of disbelief for the moment, which constitutes poetic faith. Mr. Wordsworth, on the other hand, was to propose to himself as his...mind's attention from the lethargy of custom, and directing it to the loveliness and the wonders of the world before us" (Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Biographia...
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Into the Light of Things: The Art of the Commonplace from Wordsworth to John ...

George J. Leonard - Art - 1995 - 250 pages
...refining Lyrical Ballads, man's everyday was nature. "Mr. Wordsworth," Coleridge wrote of those poems, "was to propose to himself as his object, to give...awakening the mind's attention from the lethargy of custom . . . the film of familiarity and selfish solicitude [whereby] we have eyes, yet see not, ears that...
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Development and the Arts: Critical Perspectives

Margery B. Franklin, Bernard Kaplan - Psychology - 1994 - 257 pages
...of normal adulthood (secondary autocentricity), Coleridge (1907) describes the proper goal of art as "to give the charm of novelty to things of every day,...mind's attention from the lethargy of custom, and directing it to the loveliness and the wonders of the world before us" (II, p. 6). Both Coleridge and...
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In the First Country of Places: Nature, Poetry, and Childhood Memory

Louise Chawla - Poetry - 1994 - 234 pages
...that willing suspension of disbelief for the moment, which constitutes poetic faith. Mr. Wordsworth, on the other hand, was to propose to himself as his...to give the charm of novelty to things of every day ... by awakening the mind's attention from the lethargy of custom, and directing it to the loveliness...
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Landscape, Liberty and Authority: Poetry, Criticism and Politics from ...

Tim Fulford - Literary Criticism - 1996 - 251 pages
...Ballads as being to put commonplace truths in an interesting point of view or, in Coleridge's phrase, 'to give the charm of novelty to things of every day;...to excite a feeling analogous to the supernatural' (BL, vol. n, p. 7). And it contests the implications of Johnson's view, expressed in the Life of Milton...
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The Night Is Large: Collected Essays, 1938-1995

Martin Gardner - Biography & Autobiography - 1997 - 608 pages
...that willing suspension of disbelief for the moment, which constitutes poetic faith. Mr. Wordsworth, on the other hand, was to propose to himself as his...mind's attention from the lethargy of custom, and directing it to the loveliness and the wonders of the world before us; an inexhaustible treasure, but...
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Faith and Doubt: Religion and Secularization in Literature from Wordsworth ...

R. L. Brett - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 261 pages
...to his own. Wordsworth's object, he tells us, is to give the charm of novelty to things of everyday, and to excite a feeling analogous to the supernatural,...mind's attention from the lethargy of custom, and directing it to the loveliness and wonders of the world before us; an inexhaustible treasure, but for...
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Marx’s Attempt to Leave Philosophy

Daniel Brudney - Philosophy - 1998 - 425 pages
...The goal of Lyrical Ballads, Coleridge says, is "to give the charm of novelty to things of everyday, and to excite a feeling analogous to the supernatural,...mind's attention from the lethargy of custom, and directing it to the loveliness and the wonders of the world before us."50 The aim of Carlyle's Professor...
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