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" The generall end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline... "
The Christian Observer - Page 251
1815
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The Emergence of the English Author: Scripting the Life of the Poet in Early ...

Kevin Pask - Literary Criticism - 1996 - 218 pages
...sad, sober cheer. Poetry is to be religion made vocal" (435). The stated purpose of The Faerie Queene, "to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline" (407), marks Spenser's own investment in this reformation of poetic authority. In the longer term,...
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Textual Intercourse: Collaboration, Authorship, and Sexualities in ...

Jeffrey Masten, Masten Jeffrey - Drama - 1997 - 223 pages
...Brathwait's, in gentlemen's conduct books; The Faerie Queene, for example, the "generall end [of which] is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline," devotes a book to the subject. 7 Other treatments - for example, Bacon's "Of Friendship" and Florio's...
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Reason Diminished: Shakespeare and the Marvelous

Peter G. Platt - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 271 pages
...genre affords the best means of achieving his end: in this "plausible and pleasing" form he aspires "to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline." He hopes to have an ethical effect even though fiction tends to be read "rather for variety of matter,...
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The Story of All Things: Writing the Self in English Renaissance Narrative ...

Marshall Grossman - History - 1998 - 347 pages
...to Ralegh indicates that Spenser's text begins (like lago) with the pursuit of an end: "the general1 end . . . of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman...or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline" (p. 167), but it also (infinitely) defers the implementation of this program by launching the phantom...
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Chivalry and Exploration, 1298-1630

Jennifer R. Goodman, Jennifer Robin Goodman - History - 1998 - 234 pages
...philosophers, Lodowick Bryskett and Piccolomini. In fact, the virtues Spenser tackled first in his project "to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline" had found a place in earlier "mirrors of knighthood" as well. Alain Chartier's fifteenth-century "Breviaire...
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The Later Tudors: England, 1547-1603

Penry Williams - History - 1998 - 606 pages
...'Letter to Ralegh', appended to The Faerie Quee-ne, claimed that he had written with two ends in view: 'to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline', and to praise Elizabeth, for 'in that Faery Queene I meane glory in my general intention, but in my...
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Trash Culture: Popular Culture and the Great Tradition

Richard Keller Simon - Social Science - 1999 - 189 pages
...to change his audience by delighting and instructing, and so did Lucas. "The generall end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline," Spenser wrote in his prefatory letter to The Faerie Queene. He tells us there that he selected historical...
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A Brefe Dialoge Bitwene a Christen Father and His Stobborne Sonne: The First ...

Wolfgang Capito, William Roy - Humor - 1999 - 305 pages
...within and integral to the romance form. Spenser says it best himself: 'The generall end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in virtuous and gentle discipline: Which for that I conceived shoulde be most pausible and pleasing, being...
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The New Poet: Novelty and Tradition in Spenser's Complaints

Richard Danson Brown - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 293 pages
...Spenser explains that his poem is 'a continued Allegory, or darke conceit' in which 'The general! end ... is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline'. 67 This 'end' is obtained through an 'historical! fiction', based around Prince Arthur in the manner...
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The Cambridge History of Early Modern English Literature

Muller Janel, David Loewenstein, Janel Mueller, Mueller, Janel M. Mueller, William Rainey Harper Distinguished Service Professor Emerita Janel Mueller - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 1038 pages
...general! end therefore of all the book', wrote Spenser in his prefatory letter to the 1590 edition, 'is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline.'5* The Faerie Queene is an openly didactic poem, yet nothing demonstrates so well the old...
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