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" The generall end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline... "
The Christian Observer - Page 251
1815
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The Chautauquan: Organ of the Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle

1891
...manner, when Edmund Spenser, five hundred years later, desired to write a poem, the end of which was " to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline," he chose the history of King Arthur, " as most fitte for the excellency of his person, being made famous...
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Friendship the Master-passion

Henry Clay Trumbull - Friendship - 1891 - 413 pages
...And when it is remembered that Spenser declares it to be the "generall end " of his greatest poem " to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline," who can doubt that the ideal before his mindy was this friend Sidney, who had then no equal in this...
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Poets the Interpreters of Their Age

Anna Swanwick - Poetry - 1892 - 392 pages
...Spenser's letter to Sir Walter Ealeigh, wherein he expounds the intention and meaning of his poem, he tells us that "the general end of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person." As the framework of his poem he chose the history of King Arthur, "in whom he laboured to pour tray,...
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Spenser: Book I of the Faery Queene Edited, Volume 1

Edmund Spenser - 1892 - 257 pages
...expressing of any particular purposes, or by-accidents therein occasioned. The generall end therefore of all the booke, is to fashion a gentleman or noble person TiTve ner Wtiich for that I conceived shoulde be most plausible and pleasing, beeing coloured with...
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The Faerie Queene: Book I

Edmund Spenser - Epic poetry, English - 1893 - 342 pages
...expressing of any particular purposes, or by accidents, therein occasioned. The general! end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline : Which for that I conceived shoulde be most plausible and pleasing, being coloured with an historicall...
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Complete Works of Edmund Spenser

Edmund Spenser - 1893 - 736 pages
...caressing of any particular purposes, or by accidents, therein occasioned. The generall end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous nd gentle discipline : Which for that I conceived •""'"'< be most pfausible and pleasing, being colottred...
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English Prose, Volume 1

Sir Henry Craik - English prose literature - 1893
...an edifying story, carrying out in its own way the same design as Spenser's in the Faerie Queene — "to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline." This was the end of all poetry according to the doctrine of those days ; a doctrine that might easily...
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Introduction to English Literature: Including a Number of Classic Works ...

Franklin Verzelius Newton Painter - English literature - 1894 - 633 pages
...would otherwise have remained obscure. " The generall end, therefore, of all the booke," he says, " is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline. Which for that I conceived shoulde be most plausible and pleasing, beeing coloured with an historical!...
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English Men of Letters: Chaucer, by Adolphus William Ward, 1896; Spenser, by ...

1895
...expressing of any particular purposes, or by accidents, therein occasioned. The generall end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline: Which for that I conceived shoulde be most plausible and pleasing, being coloured with an historicalI...
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The Heart of Oak Books, Volume 5

Charles Eliot Norton, George Henry Browne - 1895
...intention and meaning, which in the whole course thereof I have fashioned. . . . The generall end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline." Spenser's " natural tendency is to shun whatever is sharp and abrupt," writes Lowell. " He loves to...
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