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" tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church door ; but 'tis enough, 'twill serve : ask for me to-morrow, and you shall find me a grave man. I am peppered, I warrant, for this world. A plague o... "
Notes and Lectures Upon Shakespeare and Some of the Old Poets and Dramatists ... - Page 157
by Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 1849 - 372 pages
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Apophthegms from the plays of Shakespeare, by C. Lyndon

William Shakespeare - 1850
...wheels.—FRI. II., 3. Thy head is as full of quarrels, as an egg is full of meat.—MER. III., 1. "Tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a churchdoor.—MER. III., 1. This day's black fate on more days doth depend; this but begins the woe,...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: With a Life of the Poet, and ...

William Shakespeare - 1851
...— Go, villain, fetch a surgeon. [Exit Page. Rom. Courage, man ; the hurt cannot be much. Mer. No, 'tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church...for me tomorrow, and you shall find me a grave man. I am peppered, I warrant, for this world. — A plague o' both your houses ! — Zounds, a dog, a rat,...
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The dramatic works of William Shakspeare, from the text of Johnson ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1851
...— go, villain, fetch a surgeon. [Exit Page. Ram. Courage, man ; the hurt cannot be much. Mer. No, 'tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church...for me to-morrow, and you shall find me a grave man. I am peppered, I warrant, for this world : — A plague o' both your houses ! — Zounds, a dog, a...
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The dramatic (poetical) works of William Shakspeare; illustr ..., Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1851
...— Go, villain, fetch a surgeon. [Exit Page. Rom. . Courage, man ; the hurt cannot be much. Mer. No, 'tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church...ask for me to-morrow, and you shall find me a grave man.i I am peppered, I warrant, for this world. — A plague o' both your houses ! — Zounds, a dog,...
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THE DRAMATIC WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE; ILLISTRATED: EMBRACING A LIFE OF ...

1851
...page!— Go, villain^ fetch a surgeon. [Exit Page. Rom. Courage, man ; the hurt cannot be much. Mer. No, 'tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church door ; but 9tis enough, 'twill serve ; ask for me to-morrow, and you shall find me a grave man.1 I am peppered,...
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The Bible and the people

1851
...antagonist of Arnim fell, pierced by a thrust through the shoulder. The wound was — as Mercutio said — " not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church door," — it was not indeed mortal, but it " served," it was " enough." " Now for the occupant of the carriage,"...
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The Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and Poems of William Shakspere, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1851
...— go, villain, feteh a surgeon. [Exit Page. ROM. Courage, man : the hurt eannot be mueh. MER. No, 'tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a ehureh door; but 'tis enough, 't will serve : ask for me to-morrow, and you shall find me a grave man....
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The Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1852
...— go, villain, fetch a surgeon. [Exit Page. Horn. Courage, man ; the hurt cannot be much. Mer. No, 'tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church...for me to-morrow, and you shall find me a grave man. I am peppered, I warrant, for this world : — A plague o' both your houses ! — Zounds, a dog, a...
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Lectures Upon Shakspeare

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 2001
...play, is well marked in this short scene of waiting for Juliet's arrival. Act iii. sc. I. Her. No, 'tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church-door ; but 'tis enough : 'twill serve : ask for me toğmorrow, and you shall find me a grave...
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Who's who in Shakespeare

Peter Quennell, Hamish Johnson - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 228 pages
...pointless as it is, introduces a note of high seriousness to the play : he focuses it in a celebrated pun: 'Ask for me tomorrow, and you shall find me a grave man'. Dryden, who seems to have been the first to record the legend that Shakespeare found it necessary to...
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