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" Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now ; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. The king has cur'd me, I humbly thank his grace ; and from these shoulders, These ruin'd pillars, out of... "
The Works of Shakespeare: In Eight Volumes : Collated with the Oldest Copies ... - Page 368
by William Shakespeare - 1762
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The Far West, Or, A Tour Beyond the Mountains: Embracing Outlines ..., Volume 2

Edmund Flagg - Illinois - 1838
...upon "earthly dignities" and the like much with the stoicism of Cardinal Wolsey in disgrace, " Oh, 'tis a burden, Cromwell, 'tis a burden, Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven." The virtues of these people are said to be many : punctuality and honesty in their dealings...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare: Richard III. Henry VIII. Troilus ...

William Shakespeare - 1839
...these shoulders, These ruined pillars, out of pity, taken A load would sink a navy, too much honor. O, 'tis a burden, Cromwell, 'tis a burden, Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven. Wol. Why, we . Crom. I am glad your grace has made that right use of it. Wol. I hope I have....
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare: Henry IV, pt. 2. Henry V. Henry VI ...

William Shakespeare - 1839
...these shoulders, These ruined pillars, out of pity, taken A load would sink a navy, too much honor. O, 'tis a burden, Cromwell, 'tis a burden, Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven. Crom. I am glad your grace has made that right use of it. Wol. I hope I have. I am able now,...
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King Richard III. King Henry VIII

William Shakespeare - 1841
...these shoulders, These ruin'd pillars, out of pity, taken A load would sink a navy, too much honor. O, 'tis a burden, Cromwell, 'tis a burden, Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven. Crom. I am glad your grace has made that right use of it. i me, Wol. I hope I have : I am able...
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The works of William Shakespeare, the text formed from an entirely ..., Volume 5

William Shakespeare - 1842
...thank his grace, and from these shoulders, These ruin'd pillars, out of pity, taken A load would sink a navy — too much honour. O ! 'tis a burden, Cromwell,...'tis a burden, Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven. Crom. I am glad your grace has made that right use of it. Wol. I hope I have : I am able now,...
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The Works of William Shakspeare: The Text Formed from an Intirely ..., Volume 5

William Shakespeare - 1842
...thank his grace, and from these shoulders, These ruin'd pillars, out of pity, taken A load would sink a navy — too much honour. O ! 'tis a burden, Cromwell,...'tis a burden, Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven. Crom. I am glad your grace has made that right use of it. Wol, I hope I have : I am able now,...
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The plays and poems of Shakespeare, according to the improved text ..., Volume 9

William Shakespeare - 1842
...these shoulders, These ruin'd pillars, out of pity, taken A load would sink a navy, too much honor. O, 'tis a burden, Cromwell, 'tis a burden, Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven. Wol. I hope I have : I am able now, methinks, Out of a fortitude of soul I feel, To endure...
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The Plays and Poems of Shakespeare,: According to the Improved ..., Volume 9

William Shakespeare - 1844
...these shoulders. These ruin'd pillars, out of pity, taken A load would sink a navy, too much honor. O, 'tis a burden, Cromwell, 'tis a burden, Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven. Crom. I am glad your grace has made that right use of it. Wol. I hope I have : I am able now,...
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The District School Reader, Or, Exercises in Reading and Speaking: Designed ...

William Draper Swan - American literature - 1845 - 484 pages
...these shoulders, These ruined pillars, out of pity, taken A load would sink a navy — too much honor. O, 'tis a burden, Cromwell, 'tis a burden, Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven. Crom. I am glad your grace has made that right use of it. Wol. I hope I have. I am able now,...
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The rhetorical reader, consisting of choice specimens of oratorical ...

John Hall Hindmarsh - 1845 - 80 pages
...; and, from these sho'ulders, These ruined piHars/, out of pity t'aken (A load would sink a n"avy) too much honour. O, 'tis a b'urden, (Cro'mwell) 'tis a bu'rden Too heavy for am an/ that hop'es for heaVen ! Crom. I'm gla'd your Gra'ce/ has made that right-u'se o'f-it. Wol....
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