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" Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now ; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. The king has cur'd me, I humbly thank his grace ; and from these shoulders, These ruin'd pillars, out of... "
The Works of Shakespeare: In Eight Volumes : Collated with the Oldest Copies ... - Page 368
by William Shakespeare - 1762
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Elements of Criticism: Volume I [-II].

Lord Henry Home Kames - Criticism - 1765
...and quiet confcience. The King has cur'd me, I humbly thank his Grace ; and, from thefe fhoulders, Thefe ruin'd pillars, out of pity, taken A load would fink a navy, too much honour. Henry VIII. aft 3. fc. 4. Ulyfles fpeaking of Hedlor : I wonder now how yonder city ftands, "When we...
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The Works of Shakespeare: in Eight Volumes, Volume 5

William Shakespeare - 1767
...ttill and quiet confcience. The King has cur'd me, I humbly thank his Grace; and from thefe moulders, Thefe ruin'd pillars, out of pity taken A load would fink a navy, too much honour. ( ' O, 'ds a burden, CromiueU, 'tis a burden, Too heavy for a man that hopes for heav'n. Crom. I'm glad your...
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The Works of Shakespear: King Henry VI, pt. II-III. King Richard III. King ...

William Shakespeare - 1768
...ftill and quiet confcience. The King has cur'd me, I humbly thank his Grace; and, from thefe moulders, Thefe ruin'd pillars, out of pity taken A load would...heav'n. Crom. I'm glad, .your Grace has made that right nfe of it. Wol. I hope, I have : I'm able now, methinks, Out of a fortitude of foul I feel, T' endure...
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The works of Shakespear [ed. by H. Blair], in which the beauties observed by ...

William Shakespeare - 1769
...thank his Grace ; an I from thefe fboulders, Theie ruin'd pillars, out of pity taken A load would fmk a navy, too much honour. O, 'tis a burden, Cromwell, 'tis a burden, Too heavy lor a man that bores for heav'n ! Creut. I'm glad your Grace has made that right ufe cf it. Wol I hope...
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The works of Shakespear [ed. by H. Blair], in which the beauties observed by ...

William Shakespeare - 1771
...and quiet confcience. The King has cur'd me, Ivhumbly thank his Grace ; and, from thefe fhoulders, Thefe ruin'd pillars, out of pity taken A load would...for heav'n ? Crom. I'm glad your Grace has made that rigttufe of it. Wol I hope T have : I'm able now, methiuks, Out of a fortitude of foul I feel, T'endnre...
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The Works: Of Shakespear. In which the Beauties Observed by Pope ..., Volume 5

William Shakespeare - 1771
...thank his Grace ; and, from thefe fhouldcrSj Thefe ruin'd pillars, out of pity taken A load would fmk a navy, too much honour. O, 'tis a burden, Cromwell,...Too heavy for a man that hopes for heav'n ? Crom. 1'na glad your Grace has made that right ufe of it. Wol I hope ! have : I'm able now, methinks, Out...
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Elements of Criticism..

Lord Henry Home Kames - Criticism - 1772
...quiet confcience. The King has cur'd me, '• I humbly thank his Grace; and, from thete fhoulders, , Thefe ruin'd pillars, out of pity, taken A load would fink a navy, too much honour. Henry VIII. adt 3. fc. 6. Ulyfles fpeaking of Hector : I wonder now how yonder city (lands, When we...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare. In Ten Volumes: King Richard III ; King ...

William Shakespeare - 1773
...and quiet confcience. The king has cur'd me, I humbly thank his grace ; and, from thefe flioulders, Thefe ruin'd pillars, out of pity, taken A load would...'tis a burden* Cromwell, 'tis a burden, Too heavy for man that hopes for heaven. Crom. I am glad your grace has made that right ufe of it. Wol. I hope, I...
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The Morality of Shakespeare's Drama Illustrated

Elizabeth Griffith, Mrs. Griffith (Elizabeth) - Didactic drama, English - 1775 - 528 pages
...confidence— The king has cored me ; I humbly thank his grace — and from thefe Qnuldeu, Thefe rained pillars, out of pity taken A load would fink a navy, too much honour. O, 'tis a bnrden, Cromwell, 'tis a burden, Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven ! Cromwell. I'm glad your...
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The Plays of William Shakspeare ...

William Shakespeare - 1785
...ftill and quiet confcience. The king has cur'd me, I humbly thank his grace ; and from thefe fhoulders, Thefe ruin'd pillars, out of pity, taken A load would...'tis a burden^ Too heavy for a man that hopes for heaven. Crom. I am glad your grace has made that right ufe of it. Wol. I hope, I have : I am able now,...
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