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JACCELERATIO.W of the stars, 160.
AEras or epochs, 421.
.Angle, under which an object appears, what, 128, n,
•Annual farallar of the stars, 138.
JAnomaly, what, 176.
víncients, their superstitious notions of eclipses, 303,
Their method of dividing the zodiac, 381.
víntifiodes, what, 86.
.1/\sides, line of, 176.
ARc HIMEDEs, his ideal problem for moving the Earth, 112.
JAreas, described by the planets, proportional to the times,
109.
JAstronomy, the great advantages arising from it both in our
religious and civil concerns, 31.
Discovers the laws by which the planets move, and are
retained in their orbits, 31.
Mtmosfliere, the higher the thinner, 121.
Its prodigious expansion, 121.
Its whole weight on the Earth, 122.
Generally thought to be heaviest when it is lightest, 123.
Without it, the heavens would appear dark in the day-time,
123.
Is the cause of twilight, 124.
Its height, 124.
Refracts the Sun's rays, 124.
Causeth the Sun and Moon to appear above the horizon
when they are really below it, 124.
Foggy, deceives us, in the bulk and distance of objects,
129.
...Attraction, 76.
Decreases as the square of the distance increases, 76.
Greater in the larger than in the smaller planets, 112.
Greater in the Sun, than in all the planets if put together,
l 12.

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INDEX.

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The numeral Figures refer to the Pages, and the
small n to the Notes subjoined. -

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JACCELERATIO.W of the stars, 160.
AEras or epochs, 421.
•Angle, under which an object appears, what, 128, n,
JAnnual farallar of the stars, 138.
JAnomaly, what, 176.
víncients, their superstitious notions of eclipses, 303,
Their method of dividing the zodiac, 381.
v1ntifiodes, what, 86.
.4fsides, line of, 176. -
ARchixied Es, his ideal problem for moving the Earth, 112.
JAreas, described by the planets, proportional to the times,
109.
JAstronomy, the great advantages arising from it both in our
religious and civil concerns, 31.
Discovers the laws by which the planets move, and are
retained in their orbits, 31.
Mtmosfliere, the higher the thinner, 121.
Its prodigious expansion, 121.
Its whole weight on the Earth, 122.
Generally thought to be heaviest when it is lightest, 123.
Without it, the heavens would appear dark in the day-time,
123.
Is the cause of twilight, 124,
Its height, 124. * -->
Refracts the Sun's rays, 124.
Causeth the Sun and Moon to appear above the horizon
when they are really below it, 124.
Foggy, deceives us, in the bulk and distance of objects,
129.
...Attraction, 76.
Decreases as the square of the distance increases, 76.
Greater in the larger than in the smaller planets, 112.
Greater in the Sun, than in all the planets if put together,
l 12.

.4xes of the filanets, what, 38.
Their different positions with respect to one another,
83.
.Arts of the Earth, its parallelism, 145.
Its position variable as seen from the Sun or Moon, 308.
The phenomena, thence arising, 310.

B.

Bodies, on the Earth, lose of their weight the nearer they
are to the equator, 82.
How they might lose all their weight, 83.
How they become visible, 117.

C.

Calculator (an instrument) described, 437.
Calendar, how to inscribe the Golden numbers right in it
for shewing the days of new Moons, 396.
Cannon-ball, its swiftness, 68.
In what times it would fly from the Sun to the different
planets and fixed stars, 68. -
CAssi N1, his account of a double star eclipsed by the Moon,
53.
His diagrams of the paths of the planets, 98.
Catalogue of the eclipses, 282.
Of the constellations and stars, 382. -
Of remarkable aeras and events, 421.
Celestial globe improved, 447.
Centrihetal and centrifugal forces, how they alternately over.
come each other in the motions of the planets, 108, 110.
Changes in the heavens, 385.
Circles, of perpetual apparition and occultation, 91.
Of the sphere, 140.
* Contain 360 degrees whether they be great or small, 152.
Civil year, what, 369.
Columbus (CHR1stoph ER) his story concerning an eclipse,
3O3.
Clocks and watches, an easy method of knowing whether they
go true or false, 164.
Why they seldom agree with the Sun if they go true,
168–181.
How to regulate them by equation-tables and a meridian-
line, 166.
Cloudy stars, 384.
Cometarium (an instrument) described, 444.

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