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the ener glorious, &c."

with a request that the celebrant would make a

" Carnmunicating and altogether disjoining it froin cial offering of the sacrifice on behalf of the came the subsequent part of the prayer; as on Easter Sunas the faithful join with the celebrant

, and as been communion, and celebrating this most sacred day of

day be said " to offer this sacrifice of praise for that is to the flesh : morcover honouring the memory of as their minister, and on their behalf, they too the resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ, accordselves, their families and friends." the preservation of his bodily health, which it memory of the Saints, to seek their intercession, and

Every christian has these great objects in der This portion of the Canon teaches us to honour the chief temporal blessing he can expect, bis spirta enumerates some of the principal and earliest of freedom and the eternal salvation, but he recall those holy personages. Different Churches had difthe injunction of his Lord. Be not solicibus

ferent names in this place, and many of them a loning what shall we eat, or what shall we dricker enumeration. In the first ages of the church, wherercith shall we be covered--for all that there were was placed upon the altar a paper or parchthe heathens seek after. ***** seck first the lay ment folded double, whence it was called a Dyptic, dom of God and his justice, dic. --hence his first tition for himself and his friends is, "for the

lumns, one in which the names of the Pope, the

it was the register of that church; this had three codemption of their souls." Which have beco

Bishop, sometimes of the King or Emperor, and of ved by sin ; and next" for the health" of the but the benefactors of the church, were inscribed, and and casting his eyes forward to those regions of es1

this was frequently read aloud at the beginning of the nity, whither he and his friends must pass

Canon. In the second column were the names of vale of tears, he adds, " and the salvation there for, and for which they now pay their pows" that

voked in that church, and lastly the names of deoffer up their earnest supplications eternal living and true God."

persons belonging to the church for the repose of whose souls the prayers of the living were im

plored. Thus the Dyptics exhibited at once the threc The first word of the next paragraph is difere understood by writers on the liturgy. "Comu

ing, but still united in the communion of Saints,

states of the faithful, militant, triumphant and suffercating" or holding communion withs, is by marr, ferred to the Saints, whose names follow, to the

The difference of those registers in different church

es will now be no cause of surprise, nor will it exhibthe Church triumphant,

be, and must generally be different, the principles of body, holding the same faith as they did on er

their introduction must evidently be the same. Whilst others say, that it only

a very early period, the names of the Saints whose munion with each other, as members of the 18

memory was to be principally honoured, were transchurch here below, and adduce in support of t. opinion other parts of the liturgy, wlich on sued

ferred from the Dyptics to the Canon, and as the were honoured and invoked should be named, only

enumeration would be almost interminable if all who casions are introduced immediately after the mat

a few were inserted, and toe general phrase added * Matt. vi. 31.

7

the Saints who were

principally honoured and in

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We are members of the su

At

* and of all thy Saints." Without entering into any proof to support the doctrine, one remark may be allowed, that whatever merits we attribute to thein, or whatever aid we expect from them, must all be from that great source of good to us “Christ our Lord." And in the invocation we only follow what has been transmitted to us from the days of the Apostles, by whose immediate disciples their names were placed upon the Registers, and to which were afterwards added the names of those who like them bad lived in the practice of virtue, and died in the odour of sanctity. Mention was made of them at the altar, ag St. Augustine says, ** At the very table, we corumemorate them, not that we should pray for them, but rather, that they might pray for us” and in another place f “ It is an injury to pray for a Martyr, to whose prayers we should be commended." And thus as a learned expounder of the Canon writes “ We honour the head in his members, God in his Saints."

Being thus fortified by the intercession of those Saints, the celebrant now spreads his hands over the offerings: as the high priest of Judea formerly laid his hands upon the goat to load that victim with the sins of the people, and as the priests of the old law always laid their hands upon the heads of those victims which were offered for sin. By laying his hands thus over the oblation, he too indentifies himself therewith, and thus make the complete sacrifice of himself, the people, and the bread and wide to the Lord, for the purposes recited in the prayer, where he intreats the Almighty “graciously to accept this oblation of his servitude" in the ministry “ as also of his whole

family” that congregation of which he is the head. The special objects now enumerated are first “ the disposition of our days in peace." That • Tract 84 in Joan. + Serm. 17 de verbis Apost. f Odo

Camerao, in Expos. Sac. Can, dis. .

" and of all thy Saints. Without entering inte prace which is the result of a good conscience, that proof to support the doctrine, one remarks may

peace which the world cannot give *.because the lowed, that whatever merits we attribute #

world frequently lulls the conscience into a deceitor whatever aid we expect from them, mestá fal repose, saying peace, peace, and there is no Lord." And in the invocation we only folle eternal damnation," by keeping us in this life from sin, from that great source of good to us "Chrik peace; the second object is to “preserve us from has been transmitted to us from the days of the which alone can produce damnation; and the third tles, by whose immediate disciples their namese

object is, to rank us in the number of the elect"; placed upon the Registers,

and to which were

because in his mercy he can choose us, and select wards added the names of those who like these us, and give us extraordinary aid, whereby favourlived in the practice of virtue, and died in the mig us in his good will, more than others, to whom St. Augustine says, *** At the very table, we saved, if they will correspond therewith; he can of sanctity. Mention was made of them at the list the gives a sufficiency of grace to enable them to be memorate them, not that we should pray for potr forth bis assistance more abundantly upon us, but rather, that they might pray for us" and ine and thus insure our Salvation by his extraordinary ther place " It is an injury to pray for a de mercy. All this we implore " through Christ our to whose prayers we should be commended."

Lord," who exhorts us to ask in his name. thus as a learned expounder of the Canon un “ We honour the head in his members, Gado

The expression of the three great objects of our

offering in this prayer, was added to the Canon by Saints."

St. Gregory the great, as we read in his life by John Saints, the celebrant now spreads his hands erat Eccl. c. 22. in the sixth lesson of his festival in the

Being thus fortified by the intercession d' the Deacon, L. 2. n. 17. in Walfridus lib de rebus. his hands upon the goat to load that victim vti Hist. Eccl. 1 2. c 1.6 And also in the celebration offerings: as the high priest of Judea formend Breviary, March 12, and from the venerable Bede sins of the people, and as the priests of the del of the Mass, he superadded these phrases full of the tims which were offered for sin. By laying her er Amalarius in prefat 2. in lib. de Ofi. states that the always laid their hands upon the heads of the greatest perfection Diesque Noeiros &c. Howev. thus over the oblation, he too indentibes list objects were substantially contained in the Canon ia

the times of St. Ambrose, which was two hundred therewith, and thus make the complete acris himself, the people, and the bread and wide aux

We now come to the prayer which immediately Lord, for the purposes recited in the prapet," oblation of his servitude" in the ministry girl every latin formula that is extant, and which has alhe intreats the Almighty "graciously to accept precedes the consecration, and which we find in of his whole family" that congregation of which ways been looked upon as having been altogether the head. The special objects nor enumerater

derived from the Apostles. And as regards the sub

stance of the prayers, the only difference between first * the disposition of our days in peace."

the Latin and the Eastern liturgies on this point, is, * Tract 84 in Joan. Sem. 17 de verbis Apost

*John ziv 27. + Jokin xvi 24. Camerac. in Expos. Sac. Cag, dis, ė.

years earlier.

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that the Greeks repeat the prayer which they have correspondent to this, after the form instituted by our Saviour, and the Latins place it immediately before the words of his institution.

We are now arrived at that part wbich is the most solemn, important, and interesting of the en. tire, every thing hitherto had reference remotely or proximately to the awful moment which approaches. For now the true victim is about to be produced. In a well regulated Cathedral this indeed is a moment of splendid, improving, and edifying exhibition to the well instructed Christian. The joyful hosannas of the Organ have died away in deep and solemn notes which seemed to be gradually lost as they ascended to the throne of God, and solemn silence pervades the church; the celebrant stands bareheaded, about to perform the most awful duty in which man could possibly be engaged. His assistants in profound expectation await the performance of that duty; taper-bearers line the sides of the Sanctuary, and with their lighted lamps await the arrival of their Lord. Incence-bearers kneel, ready to envelope the altar in a cloud of perfumes which represents the prayers of the Saints; and at the moment of the consecration when the celebrant elevates the host, and the tinkling of a small bell gives no tice of the arrival of the lamb, every knee is bent, every head is bowed, gratulating music bursts upon the ear, and the lights which suci round the throne of him who comes to save a world, are seen dimly blazing through the clouds of perfumed smoke, which envelopes this mystic place. Yet even on the most bumble altar which religion rears, and at which poverty attends, though stripped of all external pomp and circumstance of show; the same victim is found, the same graces may be obtained, and purer piety may kneel with more sensible devotion, and form a closer alliance with the Saviour of the world, espe. cially if by eating his flesh, and drinking his blood,

to them,

blood

that the Greeks repeat the prayer which they be the union of abode in Christ should take place, * for correspondent to this, after the forum instituida ha flesh is meat indeed, and his blood is drink" inour Saviour, and the Latins place it immediately deed. 3) fore the words of his institution. We are now arrived at that part which is of the Saviour, at the institution. Jesus took bread,

We have in the gospels a short record of the acts most solemn, important, and interesting of the and blessed, and brake: and he gave to his Disciples proximately to the awful moment which apparenting the chalice, he tire, every thing hitherto had reference remote and mid: take ye and eat : this is my body, and tak. For now the true victim is about to be proud saying: Drink ye all of this. For this is

gave thanks, and

gave

my In a well regulated Cathedral this indeed bear

of the new testament, which skall be shed for many, ment of splendid, improving, and edifying est unto remission of sins. Here we find the acts to be tion to the well instructed Christiao. The

taking bread, blessing it, breaking it, giving to his hosannas of the Organ have died away in decal

disciples what he held, accompanied by a declaration solemn notes which seemed

to be gradually s

that it was his body. This is no place to enter upon they ascended to the throne of God

, and solemn

an examination of the meaning of the word brake, lence pervades the church; the celebrant sa

as this is not a controversial disquisition; but it may bareheaded, about to perform the most awful bet be observed that many eminent linguists, and deep which man could possibly be engaged. His s

antiquarians, and learned divines, state the meaning ants in profound expectation await the perfumes

to be breaking in sacrifice, because the word has of that duty; taper-bearers line the sides del

been frequently used in that sense ; and this they

state to be the key to the explanation of the words Sanctuary, and with their lighted lamps 270 arrival of their Lord. Incence-bearers kneel. A

in St. Mark xiy. 22. where the whole is described to envelope the altar in a cloud of perfumei

as one act, blessing broke; that is by his blessing of

fered the Sacrifice; and to that of St. Luke xxii. 19. ment of the consecration when the celebrant ekti represents the prayers of the Saints; and at the

en to you, for they say, if it were only a sacrament it

This is my body which is given FOR you, not only givthe host, and the tinkling of a small bell wird tice of the arrival of the lamb, every knees

would have been then only given to them, but not for every head is bowed, gratulating music burst

them; as there was no other person to whom it could the ear, and the lights which surround the three

begiven for them, because it was given to no other, him who comes to save a world, are seen.

and the verb is in the present tense, and must refer to ing through the clouds of perfumed smoke, whicha

of tenses is made by cach of the three Evangelists,

some act then in performance; and the distinction velopes this mystic place. Yet even on the math ble altar which religion rears, and at which par

where speaking of the blood in the subsequent verse, attends, though stripped of all external pour

each says, shall be shed, that is future, referring to the same graces may be obtained, and punct circunstance of show; the same victim is to

the next day. But if by his blessing he did offer it in

Sacrifice, then indeed we can clearly may kneel with more sensible devotion, and for closer alliance with the Savionr of the world,

John vi. 56. Matt, xxvi. 26, 27. cially if by eating his desh, and drinking his de

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see the acts to

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