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I.

CANDOUR.

pay

the deficiency!" Her defire was was supposed to be the richest man. initandly complied with ; and filling in the king's dominions, and there. up a giais, the rook it in her hand, fore the fitteit bird to begin pluck, and addreifid her son in the follow- ing) of a free gift of ten thousand ing magnanimous words; wherein marks ; which in those days, was the yearnings of nature are so blend- an enormous sum. The Ifraelite ed with the characteristical evidences resufing, John ordered one of his of a great foul, that, in her, one teeth to be drawn every day, till he hardly knows which most to admire, should confent. The Jew loit eleven the affectionate parent or the loyal of his teeth, and then paid the sum matron. “ Johnny,” says she, “you required of him; which was only are my only child; I confess I to support the king's abnoxious could have willied you to have favourites. staid at home until you had laid my grey hairs in the grave ; but ANECDOTES. since it has so happened, I am re

[Selected by T. W.] signed. May God bless and prof: per you; and remember to stick close to the profeflion you have em. braced, until you are regularly dilo GEORGE I. being at a masked charged ; wher, if I am alive, come ball, fell into conversation with a home in whatever condition you lady whom he did not know through may, you shall meet with a hearty her disguise. She proposed a rewelcome : but it ever you return in freshment at the side-board; the a clandestine manner, depend upon king consented; and some wine beit, I Mali be the first to give the ne. ing poured out, " To the health cessary information in order to your of the pretender!" said the lady : being apprehended and brought to " With all my heart!" answered condigno punilhiment.” She then that truly generous monarch; “I drank" his majetty's health, and drink fincerely to the health of unwishing them all success, returned fortunate princes !” home.

It would be unpardonable to conceal the noble peer's conduct upon

A Young divine, of great merit the occasion. When informed of and profound learning, but without the above, he sent for the young employ, preached one day in the man, and finding a tolerable (rare of cathedral of Worcester in presence education had been bestowed upon of the bishop, Dr. Hough; and him, immediately presented him made an'excellent discourse, in which with a halbert; he likewise fettled he discovered extraordinary talents. an annuity upon his mother, which The prelate, curious to kvow fomeThe enjoyed until her death : nor thing further of the preacher, sent did this happen before she saw her the church-beadle with orders to ask son honourabls return; and, as the his name, if he had a benefice, and seward of his fidelity, receive a com

where he lived. " Present my refortable fituation in his lord hip's spects to the bishop!” answered the family, which he still enjoys.

divine,

66 and tell him my name is

Lewis, that I have no benefice, and KING JOHN AND THE JEW.

that I stay in the province of Wales,

where I don't live, but as it were [Transmitted by our Correspondent L.]

die of want." The bishop did not KING John being once at Brif. fatisfy himself with bare pity ; he tol, made a demand on a Jew (who immediately placed this young but

deserving

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AN HISTORICAL ANECDOTE FROM

AULUS GELLIUS.

1

deserving man in an advantageous and her inquiries more minute,
fituation, and in the high road to Intelligence fie must have; all eva-
preferment.

fions were in vain. By fair speeches
and entreaties, with liberal promises,

the endeavoured to break open chis
SECRESY.

little casket of secrely ; but these
mearis proving ineffectuul, she adopt.
ed rigorous ineasures, and had re-

course to stripes and violent threats;
[Transmitted by T. C. of Faversham.]

being determined that force should THE fenators of Romne had or. extort, what lenity could not effect. dained, that, during their consulta- The youth finding his mother's tions in the fenate-house, each se menaces to be very harsh, but her. nator should be permitted to bring stripes more severe, lays her and her his son with him, who was to de- fond conceit in one scale; his father, part, if occasion required; but this his own honour, and the folemn favour was not general, being re- injunctions to secrefy in the oiher ftricted only to the fons of noble- scale; and finding the latter greatly men; who in those days were tu. preponderate, with a noble and hea tored from their infancy in the vir- roic fpirit, preserved his honour, at tue of fecrefy, and thereby qualified the risk of his mother's difpleasure, in their riper years, to discharge the and thus endeavoured to relieve her most important offices of government anxiety : “ Madam, you may well with fidelity and wisdom. About blame the senate for their long site, this time it happened that the fe- ting, at least for their presuming 10, nators met on a very important case, call in question a cafe so truly im, and the affair requiring mature deli- pertinent ; except the wives of the beration, they were detained longer senators are allowed to consult on than usual in the senate-house, and it, there can be no hope of a conclus the conclusion of their determina- fion. I speak this only from my, tions adjourned to the following own opinion; I know their gravity day; each member engaging, in the will eahly confound my juvenile inean time, to keep secret the trans. apprehensions ; yet whether nature actions of the meeting. Among or duty instructs me to do so, I canother noblemen's sons who attended not tell. It seems necessary to them on the occasion, was the son of the for the increase of people, and the grave Papyrus; a family of great public good, that every senator renown and fplendour. This youth should be allowed two wives ; or was no less remarkable for the extent otherwise their wives two husbands. of his genius, than for the prudence I fall hardly incline to call under of his deportment. On his return one roof, two men by the name of home, his mother, anxious to know. father. I had rather with cheere what important case had been de- fulness falute two women by the bated in the senate that day, which name.of mother. This is the ques.. had detained the senators fo long tion, madam, and to-morrow it is to beyond their usual hour, intreated be determined.” His mother hearing him to relate the particulars. The, this, and he seeming unwilling to noble and virtuous youth told her, reveal it, she took it for an infallible it was a business not in his

power

truth. Her blood was quickly fired, reveal, he being solemnly enjoined and rage ensued. Without enquiring to filence. On hearing this, her any further into the merits of the. importunities were more carnest, case, the immediately dispatched

mellengers

.

to

It was

meffengers to all the other ladies and any alteration were to be made in matrons of Rome, to acquaint them the established custoin of Rome, of the weighty affair now under de women might be permitted to have liberation in the fenate, in which the two husbands. The senators being peace and welfare of their whole informed of Papyrus's scheme to lives were so nearly concerned. The preserve his reputation, and the melancholy news soon spread a ge- riddle being publicly folved, the neral alarm; and a thousand con- ladies were greatly confounded, and jectures were formed. The ladies departed with blushing cheeks, while being resolved to give their affistance the noble youth who had thus proved in the decision of this weighty point, himself worthy of his truft, was immediately assembled. Headed by highly commended for his fidelity, young Papyris's mother, on the To avoid a like tumult in future, it next morning, they proceeded to the was resolved, that the custom of senate-house. Though it is remark- introducing the fons of senators ed, that a parliament of women are should be abolished. Papyrus, howseldom governed by one speaker, ever, on account of his attachment yet the affair being urgent, the to his word, and his discreet policy, hafte pertinent, and the case (on was excepted from this restriction, their behalf) of the utmost con and afterwards freely admitted into sequence, the revealing woman must the senate-house, where many hospeak for all the rest.

nours were justly conferred upon agreed that she should insist on him. the necessity of the concurrence of the senators wives to the deter

ANECDOTES. mination of a law, in which they [Transmitted by A. z.]

fo particularly interested. When they came to the door of the

FLATTERY. senate-houfe, such

a noise was made for admission to fit with their AS Canute the Great, king of husbands in this grand consultation, England, was walking on the feathat all Rome seemed to be in an fhore at Southampton, accompanied uproar. Their business, however, by his courtiers, who offered him must be known before they could the groffest flattery, comparing his gain an audience. This being com- fituation to the greatest heroes of plied with, and their admission antiquity, and asserting that his granted, such an elaborate oration power was more than human, he was made by the female speaker on

ordered a chair to be placed on the the occasion, in behalf of her sex, beach, while the tide was coming as astonished the whole senators. in; and, fitting down with a maShe requested that the matter might jestic air, he thus addreffed himself not be hastily determined, but be to the sea : “ Thou sea, that art a seriously canvassed according to jus- part of my dominions, and the land tice and equity ; and expressed the whereon i fit is mine ; no one ever determined resolutions of herself broke my commands with impuand her fifters, to oppose a measure nity; I therefore charge thee to so unconstitutional as that of per come no farther upon my land, and mitting one husband to have two not to presume to wet either my feet wives. She proposed, in the name or my robe, who am thy sovereign." of her sisters, as the most effectual But the sea rolled on as before, and way of peopling the state, that if not only wet the skirts of his robe,

but

were

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A. D. 1035.

but splashed his thighs ; on which he appointed Subarranus captain of he rose up suddenly,

and, addressing his guards, he presented him, achimself to his attendants, upbraid. cording to custom, with a drawn ed them with their ridiculous flat- sword, the badge of his office, and tery, and very judiciously expatiated used these memorable words - Pro on the narrow and limited power of me; fi meriar, in me.—Employ this. the greatest monarchs on earth. fword for me; but turn it, if I deHuntingdon, lib. vi. Florileg. in serve it, against me."

Dio.
II.

III.
EQUITY.

Mysias, the brother of AntiTRAJAN, the Roman emperor, gonus king of Macedon, desired him would never suffer any one to be

to hear a cause, in which he was a condemned upon suspicion, however party, in his chamber; “No, my strong and well grounded that fuf- dear brother," answered Antigonus,

" I will hear it in the open court picion might be ; faying, it was better a thousand criminals ihould of justice; because I muit not be escape unpunished than one inno- influenced by private considera

tions !” cent person be condemned. When

P: 778.

CHARACTERISTIC MANNERS AND CUSTOMS.

CURIOUS METHOD OF ATTACKING

THE ELEPHANT, PRACTISED BY
THE ABYSSINIAN HUNTERS.

TW

are as sharp as a razor, he carries it without a scabbard.

As soon as the elephant is found

feeding, the horseman rides before [From Bruce's Travels.)

him as near his face as possible; or, wo men, absolutely naked, if he flies, crosses him in all directi

without any rag or covering ons, crying out, “ I am such a man at all about them, get on horseback; and such a man; this is my horse, this precaution is from fear of being that has such a name; I killed your laid hold of by the trees or bushes, father in such a place, and your in making their escape from a very grandfather in such another place, watchful enemy.

One of these and I am now come to kill you; you riders fits upon the back of the horse, are but an afsin comparison of them.' sometimes with a saddle, and some. This nonsense he verily believes the times without one, with only a elephant -understands, who, chafed switch or short stick in one hand, and angry at hearing the noise imcarefully managing the bridle with mediately before him, seeks to seize the other; behind him fits his com- him with his trunk or proboscis, panion, who has no other arms but and, intent upon this, follows the a broad-sword, such as is used by the horse everywhere, turning and turnSclavonians, and which is brought ing round with him, neglectful of from Trieite. His left hand is em- making his escape by running straight ployed grasping the sword by the forward, in which consists his only handle, and about fourteen inches fafety. After having made him of the blade is covered with whip- turn once or twice in pursuit of the cord. This part he takes in his horse, the horseman rides close up right hand, without any danger of along-fide of him, and drops his being hurt by it; and, though the companion just behind on the off edges of the lower part of the sword fide; and while he engages the

elephant's

elephant's attention upon the horse, one did in their turn, to our very the footman behind gives him a great surprise, the young one, whichi drawn stroke just above the heel, or had been suffered to escape unheeded what in man is called the tendon of and unpursued, came out from the Achilles. This is the critical mo. thicker apparently in great anger, ment; the horseman immediately running upon the horses and men wheels round, and takes his compa- with all the violence it was matter nion up behind him, and rides off of. I was amazed ; and as much full speed after the rest of the herd, as ever I was, upon such an occaif they have started more than one; fion, afflicted, at seeing the great and sometimes an expert Agageer affection of the little animal defendwill kill three out of one herd. If ing its wounded mother, heedlefs of the sword is good, and the man not its own life or safety. I therefore afraid, the tendon is commonly en- cried to them, for God's sake to tirely separated ; and if it is not cut spare the mother, though it was then through, it is generally so far di- too late ; and the calf had made vided, that the animal, with the several rude attacks upon me, which stress he puts upon it, breaks the I avoided without difficulty ; but I remaining part afunder. In either am happy, to this day, in the recase, he remains incapable of ad- flection that I did not strike it. As vancing a step, till the horseman re- laft, making one of its attacks upon turning, or his companions coming · Ayto Engedan, it hurt him a little up, pierce him through with javelins on the leg ; upon which he thrust it and lances; he then falls to the through with his lance, as others ground, and expires with the loss did after, and it then fell dead before of blood.

its wounded mother, whom it had Mr. Bruce, having arrived at fo affectionately defended. It was Tcherkin, in his courte from Gon- about the size of an ass, but round, dar, engaged in a great hunt at that big-bellied, and heavily made; and place; the latter part of which fur- was so furious, and unruly, that it nishes a inoit extraordinary instance would easily have broken the leg of affection discovered by a young either of man or horse, could it elephant; for the truth of this cir- have overtaken them, and joftled cumstance our author vouches in a against them properly. particular manner.

Here is an example of a beast (a “ There now remained but two young one too) pofleffing abstracted elephants of those that had been sentiments to a very high degree. discovered, which were a Mhe one By its flight on the first appearance with a calf. The Agageer would of the hunters, it is plain it apprewillingly have let these alone, as the hended danger to itself, it also reteeth of the female are very small, and flected upon that of its mother, which the young

one is of no sort of value, was the cause of its return to her even for food, its flesh fhrinking affittance. This affection or duty, much upon drying. But the hunt- or let us call it any thing we pleale, ers would not be limited in their except instinct, was stronger than the sport. The people having observed fear of danger; and it must have the place of her retreat, thither we conquered that fear by reflection eagerly followed. She was very soon before it returned, when it resolved found, and as soon lamed by the to make its beit and last efforts, for Agageers; but when they came to it never attempted to fly after. wound her with the darts, as every wards.".

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