Stop the Next War Now: Effective Responses to Violence and Terrorism

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New World Library, 2005 - Political Science - 234 pages
How can we humanize each other and act as responsible global citizens? What are appropriate and effective responses to terrorism? How should media figures report on terrorism and war? How should elected officials respond? What can ordinary citizens do?

How to Stop the Next War Now, edited by renowned CODEPINK peace activists Medea Benjamin and Jodie Evans, shares expert insight on the issues and powers-that-be that can lead us to war---including the media, our elected politicians, global militarization, and the pending scarcity of national resources. It aims to educate and reflect on the effectiveness of peace movement activities and offers hope, through shared ideas, action steps, and checklists to transition from a culture of violence to a culture of peace.

Full of practical, proven suggestions to promote education, awareness, activism, and political change, drawn from experts from every walk of life who have passionately devoted their lives to peace. Contributors include elected officials, media personalities and reporters, public intellectuals, and ordinary citizens, all who are eager to find the most appropriate and effective responses to terrorism (other than bombing the hell out of third-world countries). Includes short essays, interviews, poems, illustrations, Q&As, action tips, and more.
 

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User Review  - beau.p.laurence - LibraryThing

important work for the current day. most of the essays are good, but a few fell into the tired cliches about women being naturally more peaceful than men (um, have you heard of Margaret Thatcher ... Read full review

Stop the next war now: effective responses to violence and terrorism

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

The editors, cofounders of CODEPINK: Women for Peace, have collected essays, letters, poems, and quotes highly critical of the Iraq war, President Bush, and war and terrorism in general. Their ... Read full review

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About the author (2005)

Alice Walker won the Pulitzer Prize and the American Book Award for her novel The Color Purple. Her other bestselling novels include By the Light of My Father's Smile, Possessing the Secret of Joy, and The Temple of My Familiar. She is also the author of two collections of short stories, three collections of essays, five volumes of poetry, and several children's books. Her books have been translated into more than two dozen languages. Born in Eaton, Georgia, Walker now lives in Northern California.

Suzanna Arundhati Roy, 1961 - Suzanna Roy was born November 24, 1961. Her parents divorced and she lived with her mother Mary Roy, a social activist, in Aymanam. Her mother ran an informal school named Corpus Christi and it was there Roy developed her intellectual abilities, free from the rules of formal education. At the age of 16, she left home and lived on her own in a squatter's colony in Delhi. She went six years without seeing her mother. She attended Delhi School of Architecture where she met and married fellow student Gerard Da Cunha. Neither had a great interest in architecture so they quit school and went to Goa. They stayed there for seven months and returned broke. Their marriage lasted only four years. Roy had taken a job at the National Institute of Urban Affairs and, while cycling down a road; film director Pradeep Krishen offered her a small role as a tribal bimbo in Massey Saab. She then received a scholarship to study the restoration of monuments in Italy. During her eight months in Italy, she realized she was a writer. Now married to Krishen, they planned a 26-episode television epic called Banyan Tree. They didn't shoot enough footage for more than four episodes so the serial was scrapped. She wrote the screenplay for the film In Which Annie Gives It Those Ones and Electric Moon. Her next piece caused controversy. It was an article that criticized Shekar Kapur's film Bandit Queen, which was about Phoolan Devi. She accused Kapur of misrepresenting Devi and it eventually became a court case. Afterwards, finished with film, she concentrated on her writing, which became the novel "A God of Small Things." It is based on what it was like growing up in Kerala. The novel contains mild eroticism and again, controversy found Roy having a public interest petition filed to remove the last chapter because of the description of a sexual act. It took Roy five years to write "A God of Small Things" and was released April 4, 1997 in Delhi. It received the Booker prize in London in 1997 and has topped the best-seller lists around the world. Roy is the first non-expatriate Indian author and the first Indian woman to win the Booker prize.

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