The Comforts of Matrimony; Or Love's Last Shift: Consisting of Matrimonial Dialogues Between Persons of All Ranks and Degrees ... Describing the Pains and the Pleasures Consequent on Matrimony ...

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Fielding and Walker, 1780 - Dialogues - 216 pages
 

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Page 146 - Hail wedded Love, mysterious law, true source Of human offspring, sole propriety In Paradise of all things common else. By thee adulterous lust was driven from men Among the bestial herds to range; by thee, Founded in reason, loyal, just, and pure, Relations dear, and all the charities Of father, son, and brother first were known.
Page xiv - She lives in a perpetual motion of body, and restlessness of thought, and is never easy in any one place, when she thinks there is more company in another. The missing of an opera the first night would be more afflicting to her than the death of a child. She pities all the valuable part of her own sex, and calls every woman of a prudent, modest...
Page vii - Friendfliip makes the Bondage fweet, And feeds their mutual Loves: Bright Venus on her rolling Throne Is drawn by gentleft Birds alone, And Cupids yoke the Doves.
Page viii - With firebrands tied between. Nor let the cruel fetters bind A gentle to a savage mind ; For love abhors the sight : Loose the fierce tiger from the deer, For native rage and native fear Rise and forbid delight. Two...
Page vi - Not fordid fouls of earthly mould., Who, drawn by kindred charms of gold, To dull embraces move : So two rich mountains of Peru May rafh to wealthy marriage too, And make a world of love.
Page vii - Not minds of melancholy strain, Still silent, or that still complain, Can the dear bondage bless : As well may heavenly concerts spring From two old lutes with ne'er a string, Or none besides the bass.
Page xiv - ... relish of a country life. By this means they are happy in each other, beloved by their children,. adored by their servants, and are become the envy or rather the delight, of all that know them. How different to this is the life of Fulvia!
Page xiii - Aurelia, though a woman of great quality, delights in the privacy of a country life, and passes away a great part of her time in her own walks and gardens. Her husband, who is her bosom friend and companion in her solitudes, has been in love with her ever since he knew her.
Page vi - That thoughtlefs fly into the chains, As cuftom leads the way : If there be blifs without defign, Ivies and oaks may grow and twine, And be as blefs'd as they.

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