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Printed by J. CHALMERS, for ALEXANDER

Thomson Bookseller, and sold at his Shop in
the Broadgate.

MDCCLI:

AN

BODLER

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1 FEB 1928

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DISCOU Ř SE LXI. LXII. LXIII.

The iniserable degeneracy of men through their af-

fectation of atheism, and practice of wickedness

Rom. i. 21, 22. Because that when they knew God,

they glorified him not as God, neither were thankful ;

but became vain in their imaginations, and their foolis

heart was darkened. Profefling themselves to be wise

- they became fools.

p. 241. 256.

Rom. i. 28. 32. And even as they did not like to retain

God in their knowledge, God gave them over to a repro-

bate mind, &c. Who knowing the judgment of God,

(that they which commit such things are worthy of

death) not only do the same, but have pleasure in them

that do them.

p. 272.

DISCOUR SE LXIV. LXV. LXVI.

The direful vengeance which falls upon the souls of

incorrigible finners — Rom. i Part of the 24th,

26th, 28th, ver. 24. Wherefore God also gave them

up to uncleanness. 26 For this cause God gave them

up unto evil affections 28. And even as they did not like

to retain God in their knowledge, God gave them over to

a reprobate mind.

p. 288.

Rom. i. 29. Being filled with all unrighteousness, forni-

cation, wickedness, covetousness, maliciousness ; full of

envy, murder, debate, deceit, malignity; z hisperers, &c.

p. 306.

Rom. i 27. last part. Receiving in themselves that re-

compence of their error which was meet. p. 335.

DISCOURSE LXVII. LXVIII.

Whatsoever things are true — Phil. iv. 8. Finally,

brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things

are honest, whatsoever things are jufi, whatsoever things

are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things

are of good report ; if there be any virtue, if there be an

ny prais, think on these things. I P : 368. 385.

DISCOURSÉ LXIX. LXX.

Whatsoever things are honest. From the farize

text.

p. 399. 420.

PREFACE

Mongst those many things which are made 1 publick ; it may be thought, perhaps, of fermons ; that they are, of any other, the least wanted, and, for the future, least likely to be found wanting : since to that rich and inexhaustible store, with which the learned and orthodox divines of England have already furnished us, there is daily fresh addition, from worthy and able hands. Neither have we cause to fear a cessation in this kind ; or that so great a blessing is likely to fail us, for the future ; having such security, not only from the unwearied zeal of present divines (of whom we may always hope a worthy fucceffion) but, from the just esteem which the publick never fails to thew for such pious discourses. Upon which account, we find that many of these are every day made publick; and, as it were, forced into the world; notwithstanding the great modesty of their authors whose humble thoughts and devoutly resigned affections, lead them not towards eminence and advancement in the world.

It may seem strange therefore, that in such an age as this, any one should be so officious, as to search after, and publish the sermons of a man long since dead, who (himself) never meant to publish any; or thought so highly of himself, as that he could benefit the world by such a publication.

It is certain, that we must not ever imagine, nor can it enter into a mind truly christian, that because we see not an apparent change for the better, in the lives of christian professors; that, therefore all preaching is ineffectual ; or, that here in England, the labours of the most eminent divines that perhaps the world ever afforded, have been of no use

Vol. III.

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