Everybody's Magazine, Volume 31

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North American Company, 1914 - American periodicals
 

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Page 798 - THE Son of God goes forth to war, A kingly crown to gain ; His blood-red banner streams afar : Who follows in his train? Who best can drink his cup of woe, Triumphant over pain, Who patient bears his cross below, He follows in his train.
Page 565 - From this original corruption, whereby we are utterly indisposed, disabled, and made opposite to all good, and wholly inclined to all evil, do proceed all actual transgressions.
Page 764 - ... labor, agricultural, or horticultural organizations, instituted for the purposes of mutual help, and not having capital stock or conducted for profit, or to forbid or restrain individual members of such organizations from lawfully carrying out the legitimate objects thereof; nor shall such organizations, or the members thereof, be held or construed to be illegal combinations or conspiracies in restraint of trade, under the antitrust laws.
Page 592 - I'm undeserving; and I mean to go on being undeserving. I like it; and thats the truth. Will you take advantage of a man's nature to do him out of the price of his own daughter what he's brought up and fed and clothed by the sweat of his brow until she's growed big enough to be interesting to you two gentlemen?
Page 611 - I'll slam the door in your silly face. LIZA. What did you do it for if you didnt care for me? HIGGINS {heartily] Why, because it was my job. LIZA. You never thought of the trouble it would make for me. HIGGINS. Would the world ever have been made if its maker had been afraid of making trouble? Making life means making trouble.
Page 590 - Take care of the pence and the pounds will take care of themselves is as true of personal habits as of money.
Page 579 - Taker (turning on him genially) And how are all your people down at Selsey? The Bystander (suspiciously) Who told you my people come from Selsey? The Note Taker. Never you mind. They did. (To the girl) How do you come to be up so far east? You were born in Lisson Grove. The Flower Girl (appalled) Oh, what harm is there in my leaving Lisson Grove? It wasnt fit for a pig to live in; and I had to pay four-and-six a week. (In tears) Oh, boo — hoo — oo — The Note Taker.
Page 597 - Higgins's signals, she comes to Mrs. Higgins with studied grace. LIZA [speaking with pedantic correctness of pronunciation and great beauty of tone] How do you do, Mrs. Higgins ? [She gasps slightly in making sure of the H in Higgins, but is quite successful].
Page 602 - HIGGINS [in despairing wrath outside] What the devil have I done with my slippers? [He appears at the door]. LIZA [snatching up the slippers, and hurling them at him one after the other with all her force] There are your slippers. And there. Take your slippers; and may you never have a day's luck with them ! HIGGINS [astounded] What on earth — ! [He comes to her].
Page 597 - HILL (clicks her tongue sympathetically): !!! LIZA (in the same tragic tone): But it's my belief they done the old woman in. MRS. HIGGINS (puzzled) : Done her in? LIZA: Yeee-es, Lord love you! Why should she die of influenza? She come through diphtheria right enough the year before. I saw her with my own eyes.

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