The Works of the Rev. Richard Cecil: With a Memoir of His Life, Volume 1

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Crocker and Brewster, 1825 - Theology
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Page 199 - Among innumerable false, unmov'd, Unshaken, unseduc'd, unterrify'd, His loyalty he kept, his love, his zeal; Nor number, nor example with him wrought To swerve from truth, or change his constant mind, Though single. From amidst them forth he pass'd, Long way through hostile scorn, which he sustained Superior
Page 420 - in all things approving himself a true disciple and minister of Christ, those who knew him, know that, without making any odious comparison, it might be literally affirmed of Mr. N., that " by pureness, by knowledge, by long-suffering, by kindness, by the Holy Ghost, by love unfeigned, by the
Page 214 - and, no marvel, for Satan himself is transformed into an ange.l of light: therefore it is no great thing if his ministers also be transformed as the ministers of righteousness; whose end shall be according to their works. But
Page 385 - When Mrs. Smith came into the room, he said, " I have been meditating on a subject, Come, and hear all ye that fear God, and I will declare what he hath done for my
Page 213 - him lamenting with tears the Antinomianism which prevailed even in so early a stage of Christianity. " Many walk (ie as professed disciples) of whom I have told you often, and now tell you even weeping, that they are the enemies of the cross of Christ; whose end is destruction; whose god is their belly; and whose glory is in their shame; who mind earthly things.
Page 141 - Or, as Milton has admirably said—" True eloquence I find to be none, but the serious and hearty love of truth: and that, whose mind soever is fully possessed with a fervent desire to know good things, and with the dearest charity to infuse the knowledge of them into others, WHEN SUCH A MAN WOULD SPEAK,
Page 217 - the contrary, how many, whose births could scarcely be traced, have, on taking their flight, wrung, like our brother, the cry from a thousand hearts of, My Father, my Father, the chariots of Israel and the horsemen thereof!
Page 370 - Thus to relieve the wretched was his pride, And e'en his failings lean'd to Virtue's side; But, in his duty, prompt at every call, He watch'd and wept, he pray'd and felt, for all: And, as a bird each fond endearment tries, To tempt its new-fledg'd offspring to the skies, He tried each art, reprov'd each dull delay, Allur'd to brighter worlds, and led the way.
Page 420 - of truth, by the power of God, by the armour of righteousness on the right hand and on the left, his mouth was opened and his heart enlarged
Page 354 - See me—ere yet my destin'd course half done. Cast forth a wand'rer on a wild unknown! See me, neglected on the world's rude coast, Each dear companion of my voyage lost! Nor ask why clouds of sorrow shade my brow. And ready tears wait only leave to flow;

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