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THE NEW YORK
PUBLIC LIBRARY

4920!

AXTON, LENOX AND
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS.
R

1910

Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1841, by DAVID Velson, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Sasthera District of New York.

The President of Centre College, Kentucky, has well said in reference to this work, that "after all the learned, eloquent, and argumentative treatises which have been published, on different branches of the Christian Evidences, something was still needed—something adapted to the peculiar tastes and condition of our community," (especially to many vigourous minds of the West, where the' author's life has been chiefly spent) " to excite curiosity, awaken attention, and stimulate inquiry-something which should bring down abstruse argument to the apprehension of men in general; and present striking facts to arrest the attention of the indifferent and the sceptical. Facts drawn from history, science and observation, are here placed in a strong and often startling light, and there is an earnestness_a personality—a warm life's blood of reality running through the whole, which gives to the written argument much of the interest and power of an oral address."

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Chap

Pago.

20 Inconsistency of unbelievers testimony overlook-

ed "Acts of Pilate,"

80

21 Unceasing cause of Infidelity in its various forms-

testimony of Celsus,

82

22 The subject continued,

86

23 Inconsistency and credulity of the rejecters of the

Gospel—the aged school teacher-Pagan tes-

timony to the character and number of the early

christians—their patience under suffering—were

they either deceived, or deceivers ?

88

24 Men who cast away the Bible are credulous in the

extreme—the skeptical moralist-influence of

christianity upon morals,

98

25 Men adopt false opinions without inquiry-a citizen

y-ac

of New-York,

104

26 Cure of Infidelity,

106

27 A remedy proposed-honest and thorough investi-

gation,

108

28 An example-a young man in Kentucky,

110

29 A second example-a gentleman of the bar,

116

30 Aversion to commentaries—we may avail ourselves

of the facts they record-predictions of Rome, 119

31 Case of an infidel who began to read a merchant

of Tennessee,

131

32 Use of commentaries-prophecy of the locusts, 136

33 Value of historical knowledge-a merchant of Ken-

tucky-the image in Nebuchadnezzar's dream-

a history of the world,

138

34 The subject continued--the stone cut out without

hands,

147

85 An example an educated young gentleman,

153

36 Works on the Evidences of Christianity recommended, 155

37 Testimony resisted—concluding remarks on the re-

medy proposed—a wealthy agriculturist of the

West,

38 A further remedy—the all-powerful-evidence of
experience,

164

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