Other Times; Or, the Monks of Leadenhall, Volume 1

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Contents

I
1
II
20
III
41
IV
57
V
77
VI
93
VII
109
VIII
124
X
151
XI
168
XII
184
XIII
199
XIV
216
XV
236
XVI
250
XVII
273

IX
138

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Page 168 - Dear as the ruddy drops that warm my heart, Ye died amidst your dying country's cries — No more I weep. They do not sleep. On yonder cliffs, a grisly band, I see them sit, they linger yet, Avengers of their native land : With me in dreadful harmony they join, And weave with bloody hands the tissue of thy line.
Page 124 - Through life's sad journey hopeless to complain ! Can sacred justice these 'events ordain ? But, O my soul ! avoid that wondrous maze Where reason, lost in endless error, strays ; As through this thorny vale of life we run, Great Cause of all effects, thy will be done...
Page 138 - I'll describe her. She's sad as one long used to't, and she seems Rather to welcome the end of misery Than shun it ; a behaviour so noble As gives a majesty to adversity : You may discern the shape of loveliness More perfect in her tears than in her smiles : She will muse four hours together ; and her silence, Methinks, expresseth more than if she spake.
Page 236 - IN these deep solitudes and awful cells, Where heavenly-pensive contemplation dwells, And ever-musing melancholy reigns, What means this tumult in a vestal's veins ? Why rove my thoughts beyond this last retreat ? Why feels my heart its long-forgotten heat ? Yet, yet I love ! — From Abelard it came, And Eloisa yet must kiss the name.
Page 20 - ... priest ; whereupon some zealous or officious courtiers came over and killed him : for which, as the King was made to undergo a severe penance, so the monks were not wanting in their ordinary arts to give out many miraculous stories concerning his blood. This soon drew a canonization from Rome ; and he, being a martyr for the papacy, was more extolled than all the Apostles or primitive saints had ever been. So that, for three hundred years, he was accounted one of the greatest saints in heaven...
Page 109 - At once cut off from fortune, life, and love! Far other scenes must soon present my sight, That lie deep buried yet in tenfold night.— Ah ! wretched father of a wretched son, Whom thy paternal prudence has undone; How will remembrance of this blinded care Bend down thy head with anguish and despair ". Such dire effects from Avarice arise, That, deaf to Nature's voice and vainly wise, With force severe endeavours to control...
Page 77 - That craved his help ; and by and by he spies A beauteous virgin with such catching eyes As would have fir'da hermit's chill desires Into a flame ; his greedy eye admires The more than human beauty of her face, And much ado he had to shun the grace, Conceit had shaped her out so like his love, That he was once about in vain to prove, Whether 'twas his Clarinda, yea or no, But he bethought him of his herb, and so The shadow...
Page 240 - ... receyve letteres myssyves or geftes of any seculere persone, with oute lycence of the prioresse: and that there be an other of yowre sustres present, assigned be the prioresse to here and recorde the honeste of bothe partyes, in suche commynication; and such letteres or geftes sent or receyvyd, may turne into honeste and wurchepe, and none into velanye, ne disclaundered of yowre honeste and.religione.107 Once visitors were admitted to the nunnery, the rules established that before speaking with...
Page 184 - But when he found that his young friend had calmly, and on reflection, made up his mind to pass the remainder of his days in...
Page 79 - Pyrenees, and his life was on the point of being sacrificed, when he was rescued from danger by the intrepid and unexpected attack made by Ferdinand on the robbers.

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