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that ours will be only one of the modes of communica Delegates from the city of Pittsburg, and county of tion between the east and the west: and that its pro- Allegheny: ductiveness must depend on inspiring implicit confi Richard Biddle, Charles Avery, dence, not only in the cheapness and safety of this Geo. Miltenberger,

Alba Fisk, route, but, in the certainty of its operations.'

Geo. Cochran,

William Lecky. The committee are satisfied that a canal, by Sandy Wm. Robinson, Jr. and Little Beaver creeks, will not be adequately sup Pittsburg, November 23, 1823. plied with water. The allowances in practice, found so indispensable are, in the estimates for this route, very

STATISTICS OF CRIME AND PAUTERISM. low; strikingly so, when compared with those on the other route by Colonel Kearney. The contemplated

The following statement presents an interesting view resort to steam engines is deemed wholly inadmissible. of the criminal business of York county. We are glad Nor ought we to overlook the admitted terdency of to find the attention of gentlemen in the interior directthe streams relied upon, to shrink up with the improve ed to such inquiries, and would recommend this examment of the country. The number of boats, also, likely to pass through this work, though advantageously ple as worthy of imitation in the other counties of the compared by the engineer, with the number on the state. Few subjects are of more importance, than an New York Canal, at a particular period, falls far short investigation of the causes and progress of crime and of the subsequent expansion of business in that quar; pauperism; they cannot however be successfully proseter. It would indeed be

eply mortifying if, instead of looking to the vast commerce that awaits this con- cuted without a reference to collections of facts. Every nection, and providing for, and urging its enlargement, attempt, therefore, to amass facts, should be made and we should have hereafter to look with alarm at the in- encouraged. Through the exertions of our prison so. creasing demand for transportation as a satire on our own want of forecast. The undersigned will only add, ciety, &c, we have frequently been enabled to present that the apprehensious with which they approached much important information in relation to this countythis route, founded on estimate and calculation, were and it is extremely desirable to obtain an acquaintance more than realized by actual observation on the ground; with the criminal statistics of other portions of the and there was forced upon them a conviction stronger,

state, perlaps, than can be conveyed by words.

After the foregoing remarks, it is perhaps superflu- Criminal Statistics of York county, for the years 1828-9 ous to say to the Convention, that the northern route, -30-1-2-3; prepared by Thomas C. HAMBLI, Attorby the Ravenna summit, is the one which the undersigned unanimously recommend. of the abundant supply of water for that canal, no doubt can be entertained; and it is ardently hoped that sectional feelings will be discarded, and the thoughts and exertions of all be steadily directed towards the accomplishment of an object of such vital importance to the rohole of the

OFFENCES. two states

It is proper to note distinctly tliat the canal thus re. cominended, is one which shall connect the two great thoroughfares of the Ohio and Pennsylvania, by an unbroken chain of canal communication from Pittsburg to

August Term, 1828. Akron. A work possessing this character is called for in express terms, by the charter, under which it is at Fornication and Bastardy,

2 0 0 0 0 present contemplated to act; and is, morcover, in the Larceny

3 1 opinion of the undersigned, indispensable to enable us Assault and Battery

3 4 2 2 to compete successfully with the channels of convey do with intent to kill 1.

1 ance alrcady open. A break in this chain, by a rail

do with intent to com, rape

1 road from Beaver to Pittsburg, or by reliance on steam Keeping tippling house,

6 2 1 2 1 power to tow up Canal boats, when the state of the ri- Misdemeanor

1

1 ver shall admit, would, in the opinion of the undersigned, render the work altogether incompetent to effect

Total 3 19 the great objects which are aimed at, and which it is so November Term, 1828. well calculaild, under enlightened management, to Fornication and Bastardy

3

2 1 achieve.

Larceny,

1 In concluding this Report, the undersigned cannot Assault and battery

6 3 2 1 but feel that it is probably the last act of their connec. Passing counterfeit money

1 tion with an assemblage which forcibly impressed every Keeping tippling house 1 one of them with sentiments of respect and regard. The result of the Convention is, of course, like every

Total

1 11 thing human-a matter of uncertainty; but they must January Term, 1829. ever consider the period as well and happily spent, Fornication and bastardy

2 1

1 which brought them into intimate association with an Larceny

1 1 estimable body of our fellow citizens, in a quarter of Ass. & bat. with int, to com. rape 1 1 our commo! country, new to most of them; and they will delight to cherish the feeling of just national pride,

Total wiih which they have traversed a great and flourishing April Term, 1829. state, whose prosperity may be distinctly traced to the Fornication and bastardy indefatigable industry and sound morals of her intelli- Larceny,

1 5 1 4 gent and enterprising people.

Assault and battery

2 3 3 Delegates from the city and county of Philadelphia: Disorderly house

1
Wm. Miller,
Josiah White,
Keeping tippling house

12 5 2 4 1 Jacob S. Waln, Thomas P. Hoopes,

1
George Handy, Alex. M'Clurg,
Abraham Miller, John M. Atwood.

Total

4 28

o Ignoramus.

o Guilty of Ass. & B. alone.

Bills found and cont'd.
Bills found and settled.

w Guilty. Nowo Not Guilty.

am AAN True Bill.

1

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Riot

1833.]

STATISTICS OF CRIME AND PAUPERISM.

367

OFFENCES.

Ignoramus.

OFFENCES,

Guilty of Ass.& B.alone.
Bills found and settled.
Bills found and cont'd.
Not Guilty.
Guilty.

Guiltyof Ass. & B. alone.
Bills found and settled.
Bills found and cont'd.
Not Guilty.
Guilty.

True Bill.

Ignoramus.

True Bill.

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4

1

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August Term, 1829.

April Term, 1831.
Fornication and bastardy

13 4 1 8
Fornication and bastardy

3 Larceny

2
1 1
Assault and battery

3 1 Assault and battery

2 8 3 3
2 Larceny

2 Keeping tippling house

12 2 3 4 3 Gambling

1 1

Total Passing counterfeit money

3 1

August Term, 1831. Kidnapping

1 1

Fornication and bastardy
Disorderly house

1 1
Larceny

2
Assauli and battery

4 1
Total
4 37
Tippling house

4 November Term, 1829.

Malicious mischief

1 Fornication and bastardy

1

1 Larceny

4 3 1
Assault and battery
11 3

Total
1
2

4 12

November Term, 1831. Libel

1

Fornication and bastardy,
Keeping tippling house

3 1
2

2 Robbery

Larceny 1 1

2 Malicious mischief

Assault and battery 1

2

1 Disorderly house

1

Selling unwholsome provision 1

1 Adultery

1

Forgery 1

1 Fraudulent insolvency

1

1 Ass, & bat. & false imprison't 1

1

Total 2 6

January Term, 1832.
Total

Fornication and bastardy
12 17

4 January Term, 1830.

Assault and battery

1 4 Fornication and bastardy,

4 1

2 1 Assault and battery,

Total
3
1 2

1

1 Larceny,

April Term, 1832.

1 Libel

Fornication and bastardly 1 1

5 Kiot

Assault and battery

1 Passing counterfeit money

2
1
Tippling house

2 Murder

1 Guilt. of mansla'ter
Gambling house

1 Perjury

2

Fraud 1 1

2
Forcible entry and detainer 1 1
Keeping tippling house

1
1

Total 3 9

August Term, 1832.
Total
5 17
Fornication and bastardy

2 4 April Term, 1830.

Assault and battery

12 7 Fornication and bastardy

6
1 1 Keeping tippling house

6 Assault and battery

2
1 1 Larceny

5 3 Adultery

2 2
Passing counterfeit money

1 Disorderly house

1
Nuisance

1 Tippling house

3
1 Murder

1
Perjury

1 Total

14 August Term, 1830.

Total 23 20 Fornication and bastardy

2 6 2

1 1 November Term, 1832. Assault and battery

6 3 3
Fornication and bastardy

4 Larceny

1 6 3 1 2
Assault and battery

10 3
Tippling house
11 4 1 2 1 Larceny

2 Conspiracy to rob

1 1
Misdemeanor

2
Malicious mischief

1
Total 14 23
Bigamy

1
November Term, 1830.
Fornication and bastardy
4 1 1 1 1

Total 10 13 Larceny

1 1

January Term, 1833.
Assault and battery

1 5 5
Fornication and bastardy

9 Maliciously killing a dog

1 1
Assault and battery

8 3 Bigamy

1 1
Larceny

4
Adultery

1
Total 1 12
Nuisance

1
January Term, 1830.
Assault and battery
1 5 3 2

Total

8 18 Fornication and bastardy

2 1

1 April Term, 1833. Larceny

1 1
Fornication and bastardy

4
Assault and battery

1 3
Total 2 8
Larceny

2

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Guiltyof Ass &B.alone.
Bills found and cont'd.
Bills found and settled.
Guilty.
Not Guilty.

Ignoramus.

True Bill.

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years.

delightful one. Its front on Chesnut street is more than fifty feet-and its depth more than two hundred feet, reaching from Chesnut to George street.

The Dining room is one hundred feet long, and thirOFFENCES,

ty-two feet wide.

It is well ventilated, and warmed most agreeably by furnaces, in the basement story. There are right spacious parlors-and one hundred lodging roums. besides ample accommodations for ser

The parlors are fitted up, and finished in mo.

dern style, and with great taste and elegance. The Keeping tippling house

1 chambers are, in all respects, delightful and lack no Selling counterfeit notes

1

convenience whatever. The beds and bedding are en

tirely new. Those who prefer coal, can have it; and Total 1 12

those who prefer wood, can also be accommodated, as August Term, 18.3.

some of the chambers have grates for coal, and some Fornication and bastarily

5

5 fire places for wood. Water from the hydrants is con Assault and battery

8 5 2 1 2 veyed all over the building--and a builer for heating it Larceny

5

3 1 4 in ample quantities, occupies a place in the fourth sto. Horse stealing

1

ly. The weary traveller may, without leaving the prePassing counterseit money

1 mises, enjoy the luxury of bathing: Receiving stolen goods

1

1 Two well provided bars, occupying separate places, Disorderly house

1

1 will be always furnished with the best. One in the Keeping tippling house 1

4 basement, the other on the first floor. A fire pe of Keeping gambling house

1

1 room has been prepared, to contain money, or valuable Manslaughter

1 1

effects of travellers, or boarders. Gambling with French Bank

1 Mrs. Yohe would seem to have prepared this great Assaıılt and battery with in

establishinent for the purpose of setting off, to the best tent to kill

1

advantage, the thousands of comforts for which our city

is distinguished. Total 15 29

In addition to the accommodations of this Hotel, is a Schedule showing the commitments to the jail of large and cominodious reading and news room.- Phi

York County, Penn'a. from the 21 August 1528, to ladelphia llerald. 15th October 1833, with the offence charged.

Cases.

Died-On Friday last, Mr. William Main, "ged 71 Fornication and Bastarly

17

He was, we believe, the oldest native citizen of Larceny,

this borough-he was born in the year 1763, and remov. 50

ed to Kentucky, in his youthful days -- was among the Assault and Battery,

26

earliest frontier settlers of that state-he was born with. Surety of the Peace,

69 Vagrants,

in 100 yards of the place where he died; and is buried 283

within 100 yards of the same place! This was his jourBreaking Sabbath

1

ney from the cradle to the grave. Carlisle Vol. Disorilerly Ilvuse, Costs,

53

At the late Court of Quarter Sessions for the county Gambling,

2 Forfeiture,

11

of Berks, ibirty-one bills of Indictment were disposed

of. There were about twenty convictions. Nothing Debtors,

230 Counterfeiters,

3

above the grade of Larceny:- Berks' Journal. Bail Piece

6 Murder,

3

THE REGISTER
Adultery,
Conspiracy,

2 Rape,

1

PHILADELPHIA, DEC. 7, 1833. Bigamy,

1 Malicious Mischief,

1 Arson,

1 An interesting letter from Mr. Penn will be found in Trespass,

the present number, written evidently, in a moment

Total, 766 Schedule showing the number of Paupers maintained in when oppressed by the weight of trials such as fewever

the York county Alms-House, during the Years, experience, and still fewer can fully realize. We are 1828-9-30-1-2.

indebted for the letter to a kind correspondent, from Ven Women Boys Girls Total whose abundant store we should be happy more freFor 1828

45
35

11 6 97
" 1829
57 33 5 1

96

quently to be supplied. " 1830

81 38 8 2 129 The Report of the Pennsylvania Delegates to the

87 67 children included, 154 Warren Convention is also inserted this week. « 1832 69 45 20 children, 164

The Legislature commenced its session on Tuesday,

Grand Total 610 Mr. Ringland was chosen Speaker of the Senate, and Population of York county in 1820, 38,759

Mr. Finley of the House of Representatives, do do

1830, 42,658 of which 274 were free colored persons.

The Governor's Message was received too late for inPennsylvania Republican. sertion this week.

The weather here is unusually mild and pleasant for MRS. Yone's North AMERICAN HOTEL.—This com

the season. modious and fine establishment has added another item

There has been so much snow in the inte. of value to the improvements of our city, and an adorn- rior, that some of the members of the Legislature travel. ing to the street upon which it fronts. Its position is a led 50 to 100 miles in sleighs.

1

"5 1831

HAZARD'S

REGISTER OF PENNSYLVANIA.

DEVOTED TO THE PRESERVATION OF EVERY KIND OF USEYUL INFORMATION RESPECTING THE STATE.

EDITED BY SAMUEL HAZARD,

VOJ, XII.-NO. 24. PHILADELPHIA, DECEMBER 14, 1833.

NO. 310

GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE,

of the General Assembly, to elect a Senator, to repreTo the Senate and House of Representatives of the Com sent this state in the Congress of the United States, for monwealth of Pennsylvania.

six years from the fourth of March last, the duty wiil Fellow Citizens:

devolve upon you to fill the vacancy which was thus In communicating to the General Assembly, informa- occasioned and now exists; and as the State is but par. tion of the state of the Commonwealth, I rejoice that I tially represented in that dignified branch of the nationam enabled to congratulate you on the propitious cir al Legislature, now in session, your early attention is cumstances under which you have met to perform your respectfully invited to the subject. Legislative duties. Our country still continues to be In the cuurse of your deliberations, but few laws of a the abode of peace; the home of freemen; the favored general nature will require your attention; such, howspot of earth to which the nations of the world continue ever, of that description, as will present themselves for to look as to the only abiding place of rational liberty. your consideration, will be of general interest to our To the American patriot, when he contemplates the pre. constituents, and public expectation will be disappointeminent advantages bis own country possesses over ed, if their enactment shoulıl be neglected or postponthose of every other, in its universal prosperity; the ed. With few exceptions, our civil and criminal codes extent, variety, and fertility of its soil; the salubrity of are sufficiently copious alrcadly, and contain provisions its climate; its physical strength and resources, and the and sanctions abundantly comprehensive, as well for the anspeakable amount of human comfort and happiness just and equitable administration of the government in it imparts, the reflection must be peculiarly gratifying, all its departments, as for the protection of the citizen that the government under which he lives and by which in all his rights. The former is under a course of revi. he is protected, so mild in its measures; so simple in its sion by commissioners appointed under a resolution of structure; based upon the will and the affections of the the General Assembly, who so far as they have propeople; noiselessly, but effectually, operating upon gressed in the difficult work, have given ample proof of and controlling more than twelve millions of citizens, a determination, as well as the ability, to give the State tiative or adopted; its power no where seen or felt, ex. a code of laws as perfect as human indu-try, laborious cept in the administration and the execution of just and research, and legal skill combined, can make it, and equitable laws, righteously administered, and mildly, which will, it is believed, require but little more of the but firmly enforced, continues, after the lapse of little action of the Gener. 1 Assembly to give it effect, than short of half a century, to unfold the appropriate ener- its sanction and approval. Sereral reports have leretogies inherent in its constitution, to withsiand all the fore been made by the revisers, in part, accompanied trials and difficulties with which it has been destined by bills, some of which still remain to be acted upon to contend, and that our onostentatious republican in- by the Legislature; and being for the most part of stitutions, emanating from the people and sustained by much general interest, it is believed, that their enacttheir virtue and intelligence, lave emerged from every ment into laws would conduce to the public good. A onset, whether of foreign war or domestic disaffection, further report, from the same source, of other importwith such healthful manifestations of undiminished en- ant bill., may be expected shortly. ergy and vigor, as to inspire renewed confidence in The promptitude with which crime is detected; its their stability, and to encourage a belief in the perpe. efficient and certain punishment; the checks and retuity of their endurance. A prudent course of admin straints imposed upon criminals by the provisions introistration, extending its fostering care and protecting duced into our penal code, designed as well for the reinfluence into every part of the Union; that will conti- formation as for the punishment of the convict, it is benue to cherish the great national interests of Agricul- lieved will always furnish as much security to the lives, ture, Commerce, and Manufactures, preserving them the persons, and the property of our citizens, as can be as much as possible in a condition of prosperous equali. reasonably expected from birman enactmen's. It may ty, neither fostering the one to the exclusion of others, not be improper here to state, for the information of nor withholding aid and encouragem nt from either, the General Assembly, that our plan of penitentiary rewhen it is needed, will contribute greatly towards pro form, as practised in the prison at Philadelphia, denoducing so desirable a result.

minated "The Eastern Penitentiary,” continues to elicit In our own Commonwealth, we are in the enjoyment the approbation of all who have had an opportunity of of every comfort that can reasonably be desired to m. witnessing its salutary influence upon the unfortunate nister to the wants, or to gratify the wishes of rational convicts, and to answer the just expectations of its most creatures. The health of our citizens, with the excep- ardent friends. On the first day of November, last, tion of a slight visitation in a single quarter of the State, there were one hundred and thirty-two convicts confinhas been marvellously preserved; abundant harvests ed within the cells of this prison, of which number, one have richly rewarded the toil of the husbandman, and hundred and twenty-eight were males, and four fe. a prosperity, as universal as it is gratefui, is the portion males. Fifty one of these were received into the priof an industrious enterprising people. In appreciating son since the first of January, last. In the managenent these blessings as we ought, fellow citizens, it becomes of the Institution, and the enforcement of its discipline, us to be mindful of our obligations to the beneficent great praise is due to those to whom the supervision source from whence they are derived, and to adore, and care of the establishment is confided, and to none with grateful hearts, the goodness of Him who so boun- more peculiarly so, than to the prudent and intelli. titully supplies all our wants, and graciously dispenses gent warden to whose acuteness and sagacity, the sys'em to each of us so many unmerited favors.

owes many of its valuable improvements, and t., whose Your predecessors having failed, at the last session energy and firmness in carrying it into exccution, it is Vol. XII.

47

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greatly indebted for its efficiency and success. That

Whilst we lament the depravity, and deplore the the lepraved and reckless inmates of one hundred and frailty of human nature, which give occasion to the ne. thirty-two cells should be reduced to obedience and cessity for supporting such institutions amongst us; it submission, without the infliction of stripes, or a more requires no extraordinary stretch of sagacity to trace rigorous punishment than solitary continement without their causes, in a great measure, to an entire neglect labor, and a diminution «f food for the refractory, and of mental culture and of moral and religious instruction, separate confinement with labor, the ordinary disci- which is so alarmingly conspicuous in some parts of our pline of the establishment, for those who are not so, is (in other respects) Aourishing Commor wealth; and to not a little extraordinary; but that the punishment, thus discover a remedy wwich, if not sovereign, will at least inflicted, should be so far efficacious as to reclaim the contribute to a more healthy state of the public virtue harde ned offender, as would seem to be demonstrated and morals; in a suitable attention to an enlightened by the remarkable fact, that of fifty-two convicts dis- cultivation of the minds of our youth; to a more gene. charged from the prison since it has gone into opera- ral diffusion of knowledge, and to an enlarged, liberal, tion, not one of them has been returned, is truly asto- and extensive into llectual improvement; capable of elenishing. From the organization of the establishment vating the undertanding above the degrading influence until the first of October, last, its avails, arising princi- of the passions; the seductive blandishments of vice; of pally, from the profits upon the labour of the convicts, the deceptive delusions that mask the infamy of crime. have exceeded its current expenses to the amount of UNIVERSAL EDUCATIon, if it were practicable to eneight hundred and fifty-seven dollars and sixty-four force it every where, would operate as a powerful cents; but there has been an excess of the latter, over check upon vice, and would do more to diminish the the former, for the ten months immediately preceding black catalogue of crimes, so generally prevalent, than and ending on the same first day of October, last, of any other measure, whether for prevention or punishfour hundred and eighiy-six dollars; this is accounted ment, that has hitherto been devised; in this State, it is for, partly, upon the ground of the depreciation in the not only considered as being entirely practicable, but value of cotton goods manufactured at the prison, of is enjoined by the constitution as a solemn duty, the which there was a heavy stock on hand when the de- non compliance with which, has already stamped the pression took place; partly from the want of capital to stain of inexcusable negligence, upon the character of pay for the raw material, of which there was purchas the Commonwealth, which nothing short of prompt and ed on the credit of the institution, and used in the ma- efficient measures in compliance with the constitutional nufacturing department to the value of ten thousand requisition can remove. The Legislature has the anthodollars, upon which sum, after the usual periods of cre. rity of the constitution to act efficiently, and without dit, interest accrued, the payment of which necessarily control in this matter. And “to provide by law for the reduced to a certain extent the proceeds arising from establishment of schools throughout the Stale, in such that source; and lastly, from the receipt into the esta manner thot the poor may be taught gratis,” is one of blishment of a large number of convicts who were not the public measures to which I feel it to be my duty mechanics, and whom it was necessary to instruct in now to call your attention, and most solemnly to press some mechanic alt before their labor could become upon your consideration. Our apathy and indifference profitable to the institution, and whose earnings until in reference to this subject, becomes the more conspic. then were not equal to their subsistence. It is believed uous, when we reflect, that whilst we are expending by those whose opinions are the result of experience, millions for the improvement of the physical condition and are consequenily entitled to respectful considera of the State, we have not hitherto appropriated a single tion, that if a moderate fund should be appropriated dollar, that is available, for the intellectual improve. by the Legislature of the State, and placed at the dis- ment of its youth: which, in a moral and political point posal of tlie persons having the charge of the manufac- of view, is of ten fold more consequence, either as re. turing department, thus enabling them to purchase the spects the moral influence of the State, or its political raw material at cash prices, the advantages resulting to power and safety, Let me not be understood, hower. the institution would be found to be of sufficient mo. er, as objecting to the expenditure of money in prosement to justify the measure; Without, however, ex- cuting the public works— far from it; but I would repressing an opinion on the subject, ! submit the sug- spectfully urge that whilst the one is being successfully gestion itself for the consideration of the General As- ! done, the other should not be left undone; indeed, sembly,

judging from the flattering indications already given by In pursuance of the authority and directions contain the former, there is reason to believe that, from the reed in the act of the twenty-seventh February last, "pela dundant and progressively increasing revenue, which tive to the Western and Eastern Penitentiuries, and the may with great certainty be expected to flow into the Philadelphia County Prisons;" the Inspectors of the treasury from that source, much aid may, at no distant Western Penitentiary have been actively engaged in day, bé derived to the latter, should it be found expeeffecting the alterations in the structure of that estab. dient to resort to that branch of the public revenue for lishment, contemplated in the first section of the act; such a purpose. and of the one hundred and eighty-four cells authorised According to the returns of the last census, we have, to be constructed, the stone and brick work of a block in Pennsylvania, five hundred and eighty-one thousand consisting of one hundred and four cells of two stories one hundred and eighty children, under the age of fif, in height, adapted to the discipline of solitary confine teen years, and one hundred and forty-nine thousand ment with labor as practised in the Eastern Penitentia- and eighty-nine, between the ages of fifteen and twenty ry, is nearly completed, and the other work pertaining years, forming an aggregate of seven hundred and thirto them is also considerably advanced. It is confidently iy-thousand two hundred and sixty-nine juvenile perbelieved that with proper exertions this tier of cells will sons of both sexes, under the age of twenty years, be fit for the reception of convicis early in the month most of them requiring more or less instruction. And of April next. Other important portions of the work, yet, with all this numerous youthful population, growforming essential parts of the contemplatod alterations, ing up around us, who in a few years are to be our rol, consisting of structures of various kinds, are in a state ers and our law givers, the defenders of our country and of active forwardness, and will, together with the cells the pillars of the state, and upon whose education will above mentioned, be roofed and closed in, during the depend, in a great measure, the preservation of our lipresent season. When both these establishments shall berties and the safety of the republic, we have neither have been entirely completed, and the system of disci- schools established for their instruction, nor provision pline intended to be enforced throughout, shall have made by law, for establishing them as enjoined by the

fone into full operation, it is not doubted that a consi- constitution, How many of the number last mentioned derable revenue will be derived to the State from these would be entitled, within the meaning of the constitu

tion, to be laught gratis," I have no means of ascer

sources,

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