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" It is, however, very proper to begin with a capital, 1. The first word of every book, chapter, letter, note, or any other piece of writing. 2. The first word after a period ; and, if the two sentences are totally independent, after a note of interrogation... "
Cobb's Spelling Book: Being a Just Standard for Pronouncing the English ... - Page 151
by Lyman Cobb - 1835 - 168 pages
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English Grammar: Adapted to the Different Classes of Learners : with an ...

Lindley Murray - English language - 1805 - 336 pages
...confused appearance, it has been discontinued. It is, however, very proper to begin with a capital, 1. The first word of every book, chapter, letter note, or any other piece of writing. 2. The first word after a period; and, if the two seatences are totally independent, after...
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English Grammar: Adapted to the Different Classes of Learners, with an ...

Lindley Murray - English language - 1809 - 336 pages
...confused appearance, it has been discontinued. It is, however, very proper to begin with a capital. 1. The first word of every book, chapter, letter, note, or any other piece of writing, 2. The first word after a period ; and, if the two sentences are totally indcpendenf, after...
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An Abridgement of Murray's Grammar: To which is Added a Set of Lessons ...

Lindley Murray - English language - 1818 - 144 pages
...removed. DIRECTIONS IESPECTING THE USE OF CAPITAL LETTERS. It is proper to begin with a capital. 1. The first word of every book, chapter, letter, note, or any other piece of writing 2. The first word after a period ; and if the two sections are totally independent, after...
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American Edition of the British Encyclopedia: Or, Dictionary of ..., Volume 3

William Nicholson - Natural history - 1819
...not more absurd than that of using no capitals at all. Capitals, however, may very properly commence the first word of every book, chapter, letter, note, or any other piece of writing: the first word after a period, and if the two sentences are totally independent, after...
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British Encyclopedia: Or, Dictionary of Arts and Sciences ..., Volume 3

William Nicholson - Natural history - 1819
...not more absurd than that of using no capitals at all. Capitals, however, may very properly commence the first word of every book, chapter, letter, note, or any other piece of writing: the first word after a period, and if the two sentences are totally independent, after...
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Murray's English Grammar Simplified: Designed to Facilitate the Study of the ...

Allen Fisk - English language - 1822 - 176 pages
...appearance, it has been discontinued. It is, however, very proper to begin with a capital, . ' 1 . The first word of every book, chapter, letter, note, or any other piece of writing. JW) But 1f a number of interrogative or exclamatory sentences are thrown into one general...
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A Practical Grammar of the English Language: In which the Principles ...

Roscoe Goddard Greene - English language - 1830 - 111 pages
...chapters, &c.. as, " .Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language ; Rollin's Ancient History." 2. The first word of every book, chapter, letter, note, or any other piece of writing. 3. The beginning of the first word after a period ; and if the two sentences are totally...
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English Grammar, with an Improved Syntax

J. M. Putnam - English language - 1831 - 162 pages
...confused ap; earance, it has been discontinued. It is, however, very proper to begin with a capital, 1. The first word of every book, chapter, letter, note, or any other piece of writing. 2. The first woid after a |,eriod; and, if the two sentences are loyally independent, a.ter...
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Smith's New Grammar: English Grammar, on the Productive System: a Method of ...

Roswell Chamberlain Smith - English language - 1834 - 192 pages
...omitted. Directions respecting the Use of CAPITAL LETTERS. It isproper to begin with a capital, 1. The first word of every book, chapter, letter, note,- or any other piece of writing. 2. The first word after a period, and, if the two sentences are totally independent, after...
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An abridgment of Hiley's English grammar: together with appropriate exercises

Richard Hiley - 1834 - 178 pages
...writing and in printing; but at present, only the following words begin with capital letters:— 1. The first word of every book, chapter, letter, note, or any other piece of writing. 2. The first word after a period; also after a note of interrogation or exclamation, when...
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