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ing influences of the Holy Spirit were withheld from them - 179

What is corrupt nature ? - - - - - - 201

Isit natural or contracted 2 - - - - - - 202

Are the unregenerate entirely under the government of it? - - 203

Wherein does the sinfulness of it consist? - - - - 205

Why do not mankind see the sinfulness of it? - - - 208

Do all actual sins proceed from it? - - - - - 211

Why are sinners so averse to the true knowledge of God, and so blind to his

beauty 2 -- - - - - - - - 213

What is the nature of restraining grace 9 - - - - 216

How came our nature to be oorrupted? - - - - 219

What good does it do for sinners to use the means of grace - - 225,423

What is the shortest and easiest method to bring the main controversies be-

itsween Arminians and Calvinists to a final issue 2 - - - 240, 254

How is the doctrine of perseverance consistent with all the cautions given to

believers, to take heed lest they fall 2 - - - - 243

Is it a sin for believers ever to doubt of their good estate 2 - - 251

What is the most fundamental difference between the Arminians and Cal-

•vinists 2 * - - - - - - - 260

In what sense are wicked men ignorant of their own hearts 2 - - 274

Why does a sight of the strictness of the law discourage hypocrites, and kill

their religion ? - - - - - - - 282

Are believers ever as blind and dead, and as much without all spiritual

strength, as unbelievers 3 - - - - - - 287

See also pages - - - - - 228, 245, 272, 440, 448
SECGND DISCOURSE.

THE INTRopucor Ion. - - - - - - 293

Of the Trinity, and of the character each person sustains in the affair of our

salvation. - - - - - - - - 295

Gop does in the gospél consider us as in a perishing condition - 299

Because of our original apostacy in Adam. - - - - 300

Who was constituted our public head, - - - - 301

Which constitution was well suited to the general good of mankind, - 306

And God had power or right to make it. - - - - 308

And because we are apostate creatures, - - - - 315

Enemies to Go D, - - - - - - - 317

And averse to a reconciliation. - - - - - ib.

.Ms such the gospel considers us. - - - - - 319

-Gold was not moved to provide a Saviour for us, under any notion that

the constitution with Adam was unjust, - - - - 320

Or the law of nature too severe, - - - - - 322

Or that our impotency renders us the less to blame, - - - 325

Or from any expectation that we should, of our own free accord, so much as

The Gospel-way of salvation perfectly adapted to make men holy. - 460–61
Warious questions occasionally considered in the second discourse.

What was implied in the death threatened to Adam 2 - 301,
What is the difference between the law of nature and the first covenant 2
304, 320, 458
What is it that does most commonly convince men of the doctrine of origin-
al sin 2 - - - - - - - - 313
Why is original sin no oftener spoken of in scripture ? - - 220, 314
Were we by the fall brought into a state of being worse than not to be 332
Ought we to be thankful for our beings 2 - . - - - 333
Is it a blessing to have children 2 - - - - - 336
What is the nature of satisfaction for sin 2 - - - - 369
Does it render sin a less evil, or take away its natural ill desert 2 - 377
Does it move the divine compassion 2 - - - - 378
Are the elect, before faith, as much under the wrath of GoD as others, not-
withstanding the satisfaction of Christ 2 - - - - 124, 378,
Wherein consists our need of CHRIST, and when is it seen 2 - - 355––57
Why was Adam placed in a state of probation ? - - - 359
Is a state of probation consistent with God’s making his creatures’ happiness
his last end ? - ,- - - - - - 362
Are all the common mercies, which mankind enjoy, the effects of CHRIST's
merits 2 - - - - - - - - 390
Fn what sense did CH R1st die for all the world 2 - - - ið.
And in what sense only for the elect 2 - - - - 391
Is a confirmed habit of grace before the first act of faith, or after 2 - 449
Does faith consist in believing that my sins are forgiven 9 - 125, 378, 444

A Treatise on the Divinity of Christ. - - - - 463

The Millennium. - - - 495

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I RIs E to address you upon a most solemn occasion; an occasion which forces the conviction on me, that, as well the speaker, as the hearer, must die.

It was the desire of the deceased, while yet alive, that, at his funeral, a discourse might be delivered adapted to solemnize the mind, and benefit the living; but not to panegyrize the dead.

Your attention is therefore requested to that passage of inspiration, recorded in

II. TIMOTHY iv. 6.

For I am now ready to be offered, and the time of my
departure is at hand.

THESE are the words of Paul the great apostle of the Gentiles, in which he has a special reference to himself. Though he was educated in the Pharisaic system of religion, yet, by the astonishing grace of God towards him, he was powerfully constrained to renounce that system, and to embrace the religion of the Gospel. Not only did Paul become friendly at heart to Christianity, and zealous for the faith he once destroyed, but was advanced to the office of an apostle, to which he devoted his life, and in which he spent the residue of his days. In discharging the duties of his office, he endured great persecution and hatred. That scheme of sentiments he embraced, preached, and, in a most masterly manner, defended, was opposite to the general opinion of mankind, whether Jews or Gentiles, and tended to sap their religion at the root. This gave them great disgust, and on

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