The Monthly Review, Or, Literary Journal, Volume 29

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R. Griffiths, 1763 - Books
 

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Page 25 - I don't expect from you the insipid railleries I should suffer from another in answer to this letter. You know how to divide the idea of pleasure from that of vice, and they are only mingled in the heads of fools. But I allow you to laugh at me for the sensual declaration in saying, that I had rather be a rich effendi, with all his ignorance, than sir Isaac Newton with all his knowledge.
Page 239 - God made the earth and the heavens, and every plant of the field, before it was in the earth, and every herb of the field, before it grew : for the Lord God had not caused it to rain upon the earth, and there was not a man to till the ground. But there went up a mist from the earth, and watered the whole face of the ground.
Page 330 - Must speak me something more or less than man, Which friends may pardon, but I never can? Look back! a thought which borders on despair, Which human nature must yet cannot bear. Tis not the babbling of a...
Page 20 - ... close joined together, of the most lively green, perfectly matched, every one as large as a half-crown piece, and as thick as three crown pieces ; and another of small emeralds, perfectly round. But her earrings eclipsed all the rest. They were two diamonds, shaped exactly like pears, as large as a big hazel-nut.
Page 177 - This, this is he, softly a while, Let us not break in upon him. O change beyond report, thought, or belief!
Page 239 - These are the generations of the heavens and of the earth when they were created, in the day that the Lord God made the earth and the heavens, and every plant of the field before it was in the earth, and every herb of the field before it grew: for the Lord God had not caused it to rain upon the earth, and there was not a man to till the ground.
Page 321 - Tower during the king's plea" sure; to be for ever incapable of any office, place. " or employment in the commonwealth; and never " to sit again in parliament, or come within the verge
Page 330 - tis the tale which angry Conscience tells, When she with more than tragic horror swells Each circumstance of guilt; when, stern but true, She brings bad actions forth into review; And like the dread handwriting on the wall, Bids late Remorse awake at Reason's call...
Page 21 - Empress's jewels, though very fine, would look very mean near hers. She gave me a dinner of fifty dishes of meat, which (after their fashion) were placed on the table but one at a time, and was extremely tedious. But the magnificence of her table answered very well to that of her dress. The knives were of gold, and the hafts set with diamonds.

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