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“Geraldine, a tale of Conscience," is, a work of great interest, directed to remove prejudice, and present the light of truth. It is recommended especially to those who are engaged in the important inquiry; which is the Church of Christ? † Francis PATRICK Kenrick,

Bp., &c. Philadelphia, April 15, 1839.

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A TALE OF CONSCIENCE.

BY

E. C. A..

VOL. I.

FIRST AMERICAN, FROM THE SECOND LONDON EDITION.

“In necessariis unitas, in dubiis libertas, in omnibus caritas.”

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THE NEW YORK
PUBLIC LIBRARY
280021
ASTOR, LENOX AMO
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS,

1903

Entered according to the Act of Congress, in the year 1839, by EUGENE CUMMISKEY, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

1

Philadelphia :
KING AND BAIRD, PRINTERS,

No. 9 George Street.

GERALDINE:

A TALE OF CONSCIENCE.

CHAPTER I.

Each in his hidden sphere of joy or woe
Our hermit spirits dwell, and range apart ;
Our eyes see all around in gloom, or glow
Hues of their own, fresh borrowed from the heart.

KEEBLE's Christian Year.

It was the hour of sunset, as from the oriel window of her apartment, Geraldine Carrington gazed o'er the broad lands of which she was heiress. The skies poured forth a flood of light and glory. The clouds reposing tranquilly above the distant hills, formed that mysterious combination of earth and sky, so emblematic of the soul of man; and their reflected hues sparkling in the far-stretched bend of the river, seemed, in each ripple of that moving joy, to bring beneath the feet of her who sadly mused, messages of peace, and hope, and love! For a time yielding to these sweet influences, Geraldine

farther from the casement to look around the utmost extent of country. To the right lay the old red town of Elverton, its ruined castle and mound standing in dark fantastic outline against the brilliant sky; and on the left reposed a deep and wooded valley, which presenting to the eye above the tops alone of the impervious trees, carried its

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rich carpeting between the hills, till all was lost in distance; while in the foreground stood, immovable in majesty, the stately trunks and rigid branches of

Along this valley, on a footpath formed on the hill-side, and far above the trees, were fixed, at intervals of some hundred yards, high whitened poles, a yellow pendant fluttered at the top of each, and a few detached figures moved in the measured tread of sentinels along the seemingly prohibited path. Geraldine's wandering and abstracted gaze rested at length on this line of demarcation; she started, sighed heavily, some deep emotion struggling in her breast

. At this instant began the tolling of the city bell, when, wringing her hands, she sank upon her knees, and cried, “Oh my God! I cannot die! I cannot appear before thy throne in this bewilderment of mind. Oh! cause me to know the truth, thou who art all truth. Spare me till this be clear—then take me to thyself! And oh! my God, calm thou this burning brain-send me some token of thy pity-give me back my wonted powers of mind, my courage, usefulness, my influence over others—these all came from thee. Thou canst recal them all; yet not now-not in the time of this thy public chastisement, when those who have looked up to me require them. Oh my God, I cannot cease to implore thee till thou hast answered

As Geraldine half breathed, half pronounced, this supplication, there arose from the outskirts of the town a shout of mingled voices, and, as the sounds died murmuring away, another shout arose, another, and another, while a still small voice seemed to interpret them,“ Geraldine, thy prayer is heard !"

The hours now passed unheeded on, and the deepening shades of night were flung around,

me !"

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