Historical Parallels, Volume 2

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Page 151 - Thou hast most traitorously corrupted the youth of the realm in erecting a grammar school : and whereas, before, our forefathers had no other books but the score and the tally, thou hast caused printing to be used, and, contrary to the king, his crown and dignity, thou hast built a paper-mill.
Page 77 - I bought it; and it is a wonder what will be the fashion after the plague is done, as to periwiggs, for nobody will dare to buy any haire, for fear of the infection, that it had been cut off the heads of people dead of the plague.
Page 75 - Remember not, Lord, our offences, nor the offences of our forefathers ; neither take thou vengeance of our sins : spare us, good Lord, spare thy people, whom thou hast redeemed with thy most precious blood, and be not angry with us for ever.
Page 191 - Not weighed or winnowed by the multitude, But swallowed in the mass unchewed and crude. Some truth there was, but dashed and brewed with lies, To please the fools, and puzzle all the wise: Succeeding times did equal folly call, Believing nothing, or believing all. Th' Egyptian rites the Jebusites embraced, Where gods were recommended by their taste.
Page 67 - This day, much against my will, I did - in Drury Lane see two or three houses marked with a red cross upon the doors, and " Lord have mercy upon us!" writ there; which was a sad sight to me, being the first of the kind that, to my remembrance, I ever saw.
Page 271 - Thus this brook has conveyed his ashes into Avon, Avon into Severn, Severn into the narrow seas, they into the main ocean; and thus the ashes of Wickliffe are the emblem of his doctrine, which now is dispersed all the world over."* — Church History.
Page 67 - Woe to Jerusalem!' a little before the destruction of that city. So this poor naked creature cried, 'Oh, the great and the dreadful God!' and said no more, but repeated those words continually, with a voice and countenance full of horror, a swift pace; and nobody could ever find him to stop or rest, or take any sustenance, at least that ever I could hear of.
Page 72 - But this is but one ; it is scarce creditable what dreadful cases happened in particular families every day ; people in the rage of the distemper, or in the torment of their swellings, which was indeed intolerable, running out of their own government, raving and distracted, and oftentimes laying violent hands upon themselves, throwing' themselves out at their windows, shooting themselves, &c. Mothers murdering their own children in their lunacy...
Page 68 - ... the plague was long a-coming to our parish, yet, when it did come, there was no parish in or about London where it raged with such violence as in the two parishes of Aldgate and Whitechapel.
Page 296 - At which sight the sheriff wept apace, and so did divers others of the company. After they had prayed, he rose up and kissed his wife, and shook her by the hand, and said : Farewell, my dear wife, be of good comfort, for I am quiet in my conscience. God shall stir up a father for my children.

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