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charge, and he was duly entered as a student at the University. He appears to have distinguished himself at college more by his amiable disposition, his unaffected piety, his persevering application to study and his general correctness of conduct, than by intellectual achievement. It could not be expected that he should win honours when brought into competition with youths from high-class Scotch schools, who had had every advantage from their earliest years. The most that could be expected was that he should acquit himself creditably; and that he certainly did.

During his student-life his zeal in the service of Christ was most wisely kept alive by Sunday-school and Home-Mission work. A Kaffir youth teaching in a Scotch Sundayschool and going on errands of mercy to the erring in the lowest quarters of Glasgow must have been a unique spectacle. His college career was closed in 1856: the esteem in which he was held was shown by the presentation to him by his fellow-students of an address and thirty-eight volumes of theology. About the same time he was licensed to preach, and before the close of the year was ordained, with the view of his speedy return to his native land as a recognized Presbyterian Missionary. For some months after his ordination he was employed in advocating the claims of the South African Mission, from pulpit and platform, in most of the principal towns of Scotland, a work in which he rapidly became so popular as to be sought after in all directions. Wherever he appeared the churches were crowded with eager listeners, and the modest Kaffir suddenly found himself exalted into one of the lions of the United Presbyterian Church.'

This was an ordeal that might have proved ruinous to many a young man even amongst Scotland's own sons, and would have done to most youths of Tiyo's nation; but his evenly

balanced mind does not seem to have been for a moment disturbed; and, true to the great purpose of his life, he wended his way, in due time, back to his native wilds to preach the Gospel to his poor countrymen, with the plaudits of his educated white hearers still ringing in his ears.

Before he left Scotland, however, he committed what we cannot but regard as the great mistake of his life-his marriage to a young Scotchwoman. Knowing, as many of his friends in Glasgow did, the strong prejudice existing against such alliances in the colony, one would have thought they might have prevented this injudicious step. The position of his wife in South Africa must have been an extremely painful one; and though she seems to have manifested throughout a self-abnegation of a very noble character, she could not at all have understood beforehand how effectually she was committing social suicide in uniting her life with that of the young black Minister who was so popular in Scotland. Nor was his marrying a white wife likely to be helpful to him, either in his relation with the colonists or his work amongst the Kaffirs; inasmuch as it might seem to savour of an ambition which, for different reasons, would be resented by both, and which, at the same time, was quite foreign to his whole nature. On the whole, however, the results of this mésalliance were more favourable than might have been expected.

Tiyo Soga returned to Africa in 1857, to find his tribe, with the kindred one of the Galekas, scattered, decimated and starving, as the result of their own folly in obeying the commands of a prophet, who promised them that if they would kill all their cattle and destroy their crops, their ancestors would, on a certain day, rise from the dead and drive the white men into the sea.

This 'cattle-killing delusion' was

one of the most remarkable instances of a fatal superstition infecting a whole people ever known in the history of the world. We are told that 'a Kaffir loves his oxen as an Arab loves his steed'; and yet at least one hundred and fifty thousand cattle were killed. More than twenty thousand people died of starvation, and the survivors had to be fed for a considerable time by the charity of

the white men whom they had been so anxious to drive into the sea.

Such was the state of things amongst his own people when the first educated and ordained Kaffir Minister, after preaching in the English churches of the towns on his route, including our own Commemoration Chapel at Graham's Town, at length reached the spot selected to be the scene of his future labours.

(To be concluded.)

ETCHINGS FROM LIFE:

II-ADELAIDE'S TREASURE, AND HOW THE THIEF CAME UNAWARES.

BY SARSON.

CHAPTER VII.

THE CUP OF BLESSING Overflows.

As torrents, in summer
Half dried in their channels,
Suddenly rise, though the
Sky is still cloudless;
For rain has been falling
Far off at their fountains:
So hearts that are fainting
Grow full to o'erflowing,
And they that behold it
Marvel, and know not
That God at their fountains
Far off has been raining.

LONGFELLOW.

TRUE love is always shy. The risk of a 'No' from the lips of a woman is more intimidating than a ball from the mouth of a cannon to as brave men as that redoubtable blunderer, Miles Standish. For some time after the alteration of the plan of his life, Herbert Forrester would not have appeared to an indifferent eye to have any dearer object at heart than his own establishment at his old vocation amid new scenes. In the suburbs of Newfoundland's chief town a house was taken for a school. capable of extension as the necessity for it should arise. The grounds

It was

were marked off for play-ground, garden and small farm. There was a noticeable effort on the part of the proprietor to furnish the parlour and principal rooms as elegantly as possible. This might have led to conjecture, but somehow people took it. for granted that he exercised taste and refinement in his arrangements. as due to himself. But the style in which the school-room, class-rooms, studies and the boys' bed-rooms were prepared, showed that, whatever the master's respect for himself, he would respect his pupils also, and endeavour to make them self-respecting too.

The school opened most promisingly. After all his hard buffeting with the waves of adversity, he had been able to take the tide at the flood. To his friend Ralph Holyoke, who came to see him soon after his installation as tutor to the well-born youth of Newfoundland, he confessed the blow that had been dealt to his faith and to what, in all humility, he hoped was a sanctified ambition.

charge, and he was duly entered as a student at the University. He appears to have distinguished himself at college more by his amiable disposition, his unaffected piety, his persevering application to study and his general correctness of conduct, than by intellectual achievement. It could not be expected that he should win honours when brought into competition with youths from high-class Scotch schools, who had had every advantage from their earliest years. The most that could be expected was that he should acquit himself creditably; and that he certainly did.

was

During his student-life his zeal in the service of Christ was most wisely kept alive by Sunday-school and Home-Mission work. A Kaffir youth teaching in a Scotch Sundayschool and going on errands of mercy to the erring in the lowest quarters of Glasgow must have been a unique spectacle. His college career closed in 1856: the esteem in which he was held was shown by the presentation to him by his fellow-students of an address and thirty-eight volumes of theology. About the same time he was licensed to preach, and before the close of the year was ordained, with the view of his speedy return to his native land as a recognized Presbyterian Missionary. For some months after his ordination he was employed in advocating the claims of the South African Mission, from pulpit and platform, in most of the principal towns of Scotland, a work in which he rapidly became so popular as to be sought after in all directions. Wherever he appeared the churches were crowded with eager listeners, and the modest Kaffir suddenly found himself exalted into one of the lions of the United Presbyterian Church.'

This was an ordeal that might have proved ruinous to many a young man even amongst Scotland's own sons, and would have done to most youths of Tiyo's nation; but his evenly

balanced mind does not seem to have been for a moment disturbed; and, true to the great purpose of his life, he wended his way, in due time, back to his native wilds to preach the Gospel to his poor countrymen, with the plaudits of his educated white hearers still ringing in his ears.

Before he left Scotland, however, he committed what we cannot but regard as the great mistake of his life-his marriage to a young Scotchwoman. Knowing, as many of his friends in Glasgow did, the strong prejudice existing against such alliances in the colony, one would have thought they might have prevented this injudicious step. The position of his wife in South Africa must have been an extremely painful one; and though she seems to have manifested throughout a self-abnegation of a very noble character, she could not at all have understood beforehand how effectually she was committing social suicide in uniting her life with that of the young black Minister who was so popular in Scotland. Nor was his marrying a white wife likely to be helpful to him, either in his relation with the colonists or his work amongst the Kaffirs; inasmuch as it might seem to savour of an ambition which, for different reasons, would be resented by both, and which, at the same time, was quite foreign to his whole nature. On the whole, however, the results of this mésalliance were more favourable than might have been expected.

Tiyo Soga returned to Africa in 1857, to find his tribe, with the kindred one of the Galekas, scattered, decimated and starving, as the result of their own folly in obeying the commands of a prophet, who promised them that if they would kill all their cattle and destroy their crops, their ancestors would, on a certain day, rise from the dead and drive the white men into the sea.

This 'cattle-killing delusion' was

one of the most remarkable instances of a fatal superstition infecting a whole people ever known in the history of the world. We are told that 'a Kaffir loves his oxen as an Arab loves his steed'; and yet at least one hundred and fifty thousand cattle were killed. More than twenty thousand people died of starvation, and the survivors had to be fed for a considerable time by the charity of

the white men whom they had been so anxious to drive into the sea.

Such was the state of things amongst his own people when the first educated and ordained Kaffir Minister, after preaching in the English churches of the towns on his route, including our own Commemoration Chapel at Graham's Town, at length reached the spot selected to be the scene of his future labours.

(To be concluded.)

ETCHINGS FROM LIFE:

IL-ADELAIDE'S TREASURE, AND HOW THE THIEF CAME UNAWARES.

BY SARSON.

CHAPTER VII.

THE CUP OF BLESSING OVERFLOWS.

As torrents, in summer
Half dried in their channels,
Suddenly rise, though the
Sky is still cloudless;
For rain has been falling
Far off at their fountains:
So hearts that are fainting
Grow fall to o'erflowing,
And they that behold it
Marvel, and know not
That God at their fountains
Far off has been raining.

LONGFELLOW.

TRCE love is always shy. The risk fa 'No' from the lips of a woman more intimidating than a ball from he mouth of a cannon to as brave men as that redoubtable blunderer, files Standish. For some time after he alteration of the plan of his life, Herbert Forrester would not have Fpeared to an indifferent eye to have my dearer object at heart than his wn establishment at his old vocation mid new scenes. In the suburbs of ewfoundland's chief town a house as taken for a school. It was pable of extension as the necessity or it should arise. The grounds

were marked off for play-ground, garden and small farm. There was a noticeable effort on the part of the proprietor to furnish the parlour and principal rooms as elegantly as possible. This might have led to conjecture, but somehow people took it for granted that he exercised taste and refinement in his arrangements. as due to himself. But the style in which the school-room, class-rooms, studies and the boys' bed-rooms were prepared, showed that, whatever the master's respect for himself, he would respect his pupils also, and endeavour to make them self-respecting too.

The school opened most promisingly. After all his hard buffeting with the waves of adversity, he had been able to take the tide at the flood. To his friend Ralph Holyoke, who came to see him soon after his installation as tutor to the well-born youth of Newfoundland, he confessed the blow that had been dealt to his faith and to what, in all humility, he hoped was a sanctified ambition.

'It is over now,' he said, 'and I am well content. Would that with all men the trial were so short! I believe that it is God's will that I should teach. He has stirred up my nest, changed the scene of my labours, but I feel that I am a Missionary still.' Was it some consolation to reflect that now a tract of four years did not exist between him and a certain young lady, who, it was greatly to be feared, might sail for England .or ever he was aware? He hardly knew the case seemed to him so hopeless. In proportion to the strength of our desire for an object is our doubt of its attainment. He knew that it was for her he had bought that chair, that picture, that vase. It was her figure that he saw now on the steps and now amid the evergreens. It was her head that rested beneath the carved figures on the high, antique-looking mantelpiece. Yet he did not write to her. The only perceptible difference in him was that he ceased to avoid her. Bound to his post as he was during the day-time, he accepted the invitation for an evening party if he imagined that he should meet Adelaide Brignall. His one assistant was trustworthy. He might occasionally leave him in charge when the business of the day was done.

Adelaide was never long at one stay. Along with Mr. Fortescue and Nellie she had done our hero the honour to look over his house, a day or two before the school opened. They had stayed to take tea, and Nellie had begged his acceptance of an antimacassar that she had worked for him in the tedious fancy knitting that was so fashionable till crochet superseded it. Forrester valued the Forrester valued the child's offering, and thanked her so warmly that Adelaide was quite shy of undoing an ungainly-looking parcel that she had brought with her, containing a pair of footstools worked in delicate shades of Berlin wool. His

acknowledgment of her kindness was so brief, and at the same time so flattering, that she thought he was making fun of her.

But that was really a golden afternoon. Adelaide was all alive to the pleasantness of it. There was no sudden, chilling change of tone, no mysterious shadowing of the countenance to cause uneasiness and the wonder as to what string had been unhappily jarred. When the little party broke up, Forrester wondered

whether she would ever be in his house more than an invited guest, if indeed she would visit him a second time. The sweet, shy face! the earnest mien ! the questioning, thoughtful eyes! They met him every where. At last his opportunity came; rather, he made it. He held a hand that seemed to rest in his more reluctantly than it did when the iceberg inspired terror. He tried to look into eyes then upraised to him, but now baffling his wistful gaze by persistent drooping. He told her that all the appreciation he had to show for her little gift was by telling her that he wanted of her all, or he could take nothing-not even a good wish. What right had she to steal a man's heart if she meant not to give an equivalent? She had bantered him about his home appointments, didn't she know that it was for her he had done his modest best? (As if she could be expected to know until he told her!) He had only the riches of affection to offer her; but the heart was woman's kingdom, would she rather take its sceptre from another hand?

'No'-only one word, tremulously spoken, but still with no uncertainty in it.

'Then take it from mine. You have told me of your sympathy with boys. You will help me?'

The schoolmaster sits next only to the Ministers of God's truth,' said

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