Benjamin Franklin and Education: His Ideal of Life and His System of Education for the Realization of that Ideal

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D. C. Heath & Company, 1902 - Education - 104 pages
 

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Page 56 - Speak not but what may benefit others or yourself; avoid trifling conversation. 3 ORDER Let all your things have their places; let each part of your business have its time. 4 RESOLUTION Resolve to perform what you ought; perform without fail what you resolve.
Page 64 - three removes are as bad as a fire ;' and again, 'keep thy shop, and thy shop will keep thee ;* and again, ' if you would have your business done, go ; if not, send.' And again, ' He that by the plough would thrive, Himself must either hold or drive...
Page 69 - We are offered by the terms of this sale six months' credit; and that perhaps has induced some of us to attend it, because we cannot spare the ready money, and hope now to be fine without it. But ah! think what you do when you run in debt: you give to another power over your liberty. If you cannot pay at the time, you will be ashamed to see your creditor; you will be in fear when you speak to him; you will make poor, pitiful, sneaking excuses, and by degrees come to lose your veracity and sink into...
Page 60 - ... cannot ease or deliver us by allowing an abatement. However, let us hearken to good advice, and something may be done for us;' God helps them that help themselves,
Page 60 - If time be of all things the most precious, wasting time must be, as Poor Richard says, the greatest prodigality; since, as he elsewhere tells us, Lost time is never found again; and what we call time enough, always proves little enough.
Page 65 - So much for industry, my friends, and attention to one's own business; but to these we must add frugality, if we would make our industry more certainly successful. A man may, if he knows not how to save as he gets, keep his nose all his life to the grindstone, and die not worth a groat at last. A fat kitchen makes a lean will; and Many estates are spent in the getting, Since women for tea forsook spinning and knitting, And men for punch forsook hewing and splitting.
Page 58 - I have been, if I may say it without vanity an eminent author of almanacks annually now a full quarter of a century, my brother authors in the same way, for what reason I know not, have ever been very sparing in their applauses, and no other author has taken the least notice of me, so that did...
Page 76 - Delightful task ! to rear the tender thought, To teach the young idea how to shoot, To pour the fresh instruction o'er the mind, To breathe th' enlivening spirit and to fix The generous purpose in the glowing breast.
Page 72 - I had made of the sense of all ages and nations. However, I resolved to be the better for the echo of it; and, though I had at first determined to buy stuff for a new coat, I went away resolved to wear my old one a little longer. Reader, if thou wilt do the same, thy profit will be as great as mine.
Page 62 - One to-day is worth two to-morrows,' as poor Richard says ; and farther, ' never leave that till to-morrow which you can do today.' If you were a servant, would you not be ashamed that a good master should catch you idle ? Are you then your own master ? Be ashamed to catch yourself idle...

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