Page images
PDF
EPUB
[ocr errors][ocr errors]

of God, so arranged, that the injurious tendency of the divisions so universal in our English copies, may be counteracted; is the design of the present undertaking. For the subdivision of the books of Sacred Scripture, into chapters and verses, without regard to the sense, and frequently to its great injury, has thrown a most serious obstacle in the way of common readers. It is a method peculiar to the Bible, and confined to translations alone. Yet the Word of God is not deserving of such an injurious peculiarity as this.

3. The fact being as has been stated, it may be matter of surprise, that these divisions were introduced, and so long retained. But it should be remembered that the design with which the present divisions in the English Bible were first used, was very different from that to which they have been applied.

For that there is any thing sacred in the old divisions which forbids their change, or even their entire rejection, will be supposed by none, when it is known that the divisions of Chapters were first introduced into the Bible about the middle of the 13th century, and Verses about the middle of the 16th. Their history is this :Cardinal Hugo, who flourished about the middle of the 13th century, having projected a concordance for the Latin Bible, for the purpose of reference divided the whole into heads or chapters, without any regard to the sense, and then subdivided these portions into equal parts, 'o which he altached in the margin the letters A, B, C, &c. (The chapters now continue througl:out, exactly as he made them.) 'The Greek church did not receive these divisions till the middle of the 15th century; and no manuscript written previous to thal time, contains the divisions of Hugo. The subdivisions of the chapters in the Old Testament, were somewhat altered by successive editors, when applied to the Hebrew, and assumed their present form in the edition of Athias, A. D. 1661; yet were always retained in the margin.

The verses in the New Testament were invented by Robert Stephens. He made them while on a journey; but placed them in the margin, intending them only for reference. Their utility for this purpose soon gained them a general reception.

The translators of the English Bible unwarily gave a new appearance and authority to these divisions. In that published at Geneva, A. D. 1557, by the exiles in the reign of Mary, not only the chapters, as formerly, were separated, but the verses also. This unwise

[ocr errors][ocr errors]

Ah In this reprint

so arranged, that the injurious tendency of the divisions so
i in our English copies, may be counteracted; is the design
resent undertaking. For the subdivision of the books of
Scripture, into chapters and verses, without regard to the
id frequently to its great injury, has thrown a most serious
in the way of common readers. It is a method peculiar to
, and consned to translations alone. Yet the Word of God
erving of such an injurious peculiarity as this.

fact being as has been stated, it may be matter of surprise, • divisions were introduced, and so long retained. But be remembered that the design with which the present in the English Bible were first used, was very different to which they have been applied. t there is any thing sacred in the old divisions which forchange, or even their entire rejection, will be supposed u hen it is known that the divisions of Chapters were first lialo the Bible about the middle of the 13th century, and vout the middle of the 16th. Their history is this :lugo, who flourished about the middle of the 13th century, jected a concordance for the Latin Bible, for the purpose re divided the whole into heads or chupters, without any he sense, and then subdivided these portions into equal bich be attached in the margin the letters A, B, C, &c. ers now continue througt:out, exactly as he made them.) church did not receive these divisions till the middle of Jury; and no manuscript written previous to that time, e divisions of Hugo. The subdivisions of the chapters Testament, were somewhat altered by successive editors, sit to the Hebrew, and assumed their present form in of Athias, A. D. 1661 ; yet were always retained in the

Mait, i. 4. Wherever it would be difficult to learn the end

alteration was followed by editors of the Greek Testament, a soon became general. John Albert Bengel, distinguished alike his piety and his learning, in an edition of the Greek Testame publisbed in 1734, restored the marks of the divisions to their pro place, taking great care to insure their utility for reference, and posed the whole text into paragraphs. Succeeding editors have lowed his plan, using their own judgment in forming the paragrap Greisbach's edition, and Knapp's, which are generally prefera vary little from Bengel's.

our common English version, not a wore designedly altered from the copies in use. In forming the paragra divisions, the best editions of the Originals have been continu consulted, and generally followed :-of the Old Testament, Var Hooght's and others' of the New, Knapp's (3d ed. Halle, 192

These divisions are of three kinds: First, those which comme with ANTIQUE capitals, informing the reader of the mencement of the different Parts into which a book is divic Gen. i. 1. ii. 1. iv. 1. Matt. i. 1. iii. 1. iv. 12, &c. These parts zubered on the head of the page. Secondly, those which mence with common CAPITALS, showing that the connexisuch paragraphs with what precedes is slight: Gen. ii. 4. v. i. Ma 18, &e. Thirdly

, those which commence with SMALL CAPITAL timating that the connexion is somewhat closer. These disting ocenr most in the Historical books, in which, time and place

5. The notation of the Chapters and Verses is, as the title in retained only in the margin. The chapters are noted by ar figures

, 1, 2, 3, &c.; the verses, by figures of common size. chapter or verse always commences in the line, at the end of figures s are placed. The end of the chapter or verse is always at the longest pa the line ; or, when this is not the case, a small perpendicular of stroke ( " ) is inserted, a little above the line of the text : Ge verse from the punctuation alone, this dash is introduced : M 6. iv. 9, &c. Sometimes, when the verses are unusually sho or more may end in the same line ; in such cases, the dashes at the end of every verse, while the number of only the fir

found in the margin, (the numbers of th

much into the narrative.

i in the New Testament were invented by Robert Slemade them while on a journey; but placed them in the iding them only for reference. Their utility for this

gained them a general reception. ators of the English Bible unwarily gave a new appearhority to these divisions. In that published at Geneva, y the exiles in the reign of Mary, not only the chapters, were separated, but the verses also. This unwise

ends in the line

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors][ocr errors]

being omitted :) Mark xv. 25. John ii. 21, 22. But when two verses end in the same line, the number of each being a unit, both are noted: Matt. xxv. 2, 3. 4, 5.

6. Though no word is changed in the text of our common Translation, yet the attentive reader will soon perceive that the punctuation somewhat differs from the old. This variation, howerer, nowhere alters the sense, but is intended to impress more vividly the common nieaning of the passage.

Two dashes, or several periods, are placed both before and after a sentence, to intimate that the sentence embraced by them is a kind of parenthesis or digression: Acts 1.9–11.x. 41. Rom. i. 3—7. 1 Tim. i. 5—18. Heb. i. 3. vii. 1-3. Two or more periods are soinetimes used, to intimate that the narrative or discourse is abruptly ended : Acts vii. 53, &c. In the New Testament, all quotations from the Old are inarked in the common manner. (“*”): some quotations from the heathen poets, (as Acts xvii. 28. 1 Cor. xv. 33. Tilus i. 12,) some repetitions of what had been said on a former occasion. (as Mait, iii. 17,) and some proverbs, are marked with a single quotation, ("'). Beside this, the reader will observe that the prose quotations from the Old Testament in the New, are immediately dist guishable; the letters composiu the words of such quotations being interspaced. Quotations from the poetic books of the Old Testament, are printed in the common poetic form, without the marks of quotation. Some words are printed in small capitals, which are not so printed in the common cdition; as WISE MEN, Matt. ii. 1. THIS IS JESUS THE KING, &c. Matt. xxvii. 36, &c. BY, Acts xx. 16. ONE MAN, &c. Rom. v. 12, 14. OATH, Heb. vii. 20. with Rom. i. 16, 17, for IT 15, &c., which words are the text of that coisule. The dedication of LUKE'S Gospel 19 Theophilus, with the synodical letter, Acts xv. 23—29, and the letter of the tribune Lysias 10 Felix, Acts xxiii. 20—50, are also distinguished from the common narrative. In the Old Testament, are some parts which may be termed poetic prose; these are distinguished both from prose and poetry by being printed in separate verses, like the verses in the common editions. All the truly poetic parts are immediately distinguished from the prose and history, by the form in which they are printed. See Gen. xlix. Ex. xv. Job, Psalıns, Isaiah, &c. Luke i. 47–55. The word Lord, whenever, in the New Testament, it means JEHOVAH, is printed in capitals, after

omitted ;) Mark xv. 25. John 7. 21, 22. But when two verses

the same line, the number of each being a unit, both are noted: xxv, 2, 3, 4, 5, Enough no word is changed in the text of our common Translael the attentive reader will soon perecive that the punci ualica what differs from the old. This variation, however, nowhere the sense, but is intended to impress more vividly the common ng of the passage. co dashes, or several periods, are placed both before and after vence, to intimate that the sentence embraced by them is a of parenthesis or digression : Acts ii. 9–11.x. 41. Rom. i. 3–7. 7. 1. 5–18. Heb. i. 3 vii. 1-3. Two or more periods are soine

used, to intimate that the narrative or discourse is abruptly : Acis vii. 33, &c. in the Nero Testament, all quotations

the Old are marked in the common manner. " ): some utions from the heathen poets, (as Acts xvi. 28. I Cor. xv. 33.

the example of the same word in the Old Testament. The emphasis of this word in the New Testament, especially when it refers to the · Messiah JEHOVAH JESUS, has been too much neglected. The words Devil, Apostle, Wicked One, also begin with a capital letter. This caligraphy has heretofore becn also neglected.

7. On the head of the page there are introduced the tille of each part of the History or Book, the numeration of the PART, and the date. The four Gospels are considered as forming together one history; and are severally divided into cight corresponding PARTS. These are the following :

1. The evangelical history previous to John's ministry.
2. From John's ministry to Chrisi's public ministry.
3. From Christ's ministry to the mission of the Apostles.
4. From the mission of the Apostles to that of the seventy.
5. From the inission of the seventy to Christ's entry into Jerusalem.
6. From his entry into Jerusalem to his apprehension.
7. From his apprehension 10 his crucifixion.
8. From his crucifixion to his ascension.

The Acts of the Apostles, (in imitation of Townsend,) is divided into six parts, as will be seen by the heading

The Epistles are divided according to the same general plan.

The Editor cannot conclude without expressing a hope that this attempt will be patronized by those who love the Bible. He has undertaken this labor with the sincerest wish to do good, and claims no merit, but that which is due to a strong desire to give to others the same advantages he enjoys himself. The Bible cannot be underslood, if only occasionally consulted; it imperiously demands our close attention, and must not be read chapter by chapter, and then laid aside. It must be carefully studied as one great whole. Let a whole book be read, at one time; then let its natural parts be separately examined, and after that every clause by itself. If the old divisions are forgotten by the reader, and he studies in the way recommended, he will soon see new beauties in the Bible.

11. 12.) some repetitions of what had been said on a former jon. (as Mali. iii. 17,) and some proverbs, are marked with a

quotation, ("). Beside this, the reader will observe that ose quotations from the Old Testanent in the New, are imme

distinguishable; the letters composing the words of such fons being interspaced. Quoiations from the poetic books

Old Testament, are printed in the common poetic form, the marks of quotation. Some words are printed in small

which are not so priuled in the common edition ; as WISE atl. ii. 1. THIS IS JESUS THE KING, &c. Matt. xxvii. 36, &c.

1. 16. ONE MAN, &c. Rom. v. 12, 14. OATH, Heb. vii. 20. m. i. 16, 17, FOR IT IS, &c., which words are the text of file. The dedication of LUKE'S Gospel 10 Theophilus,

synodical letter, Acis xv. 93-99, and the letter of the Lysias 1o Felix, Acts x 50, are also distinguished fommon narrative. In the Old Testament, are some parts y be termed poetic prose; these are distinguished both e and poetry by being printed in separate verses, like the he common editions. All the truly poetic paris are immeringuished from the prose and history, by the form in y are privied. See Gen. xlix. Ex. xv. Job, Psalms,

Luke i. 47-55. The word Lord, whenever, in the pent, it means JEHOVAH, is printed in capitals, after

OF THE

S OF THE OLD TESTAMENT,

WITH

HE NUMBER OF CHAPTERS;

ALSO

OLOGICAL ARRANGEMENT, DATES, AUTHORS, &c.

icus.

ronological order,
ding to Dr Blaney.)

Authors, &c.
A.M.B.C.

The ades! Look in the world. Written by Job 2.184 1520 in L'z or Idumea, B. C. 1540; or by Moses

in the land of Midran. 25131191 Conapiled and written by Moses, (the last 2013 1191

chap'er perhaps by Joshua) in the wilder. 2514 1190 ness of Arabia, and on the borders of CaHels.. 20.531451

hann. Cronom

2553 1451 The oldest historical records.
2777 1427 Jeshua, completel by Phineas and Eleazar.
2149 1404 Princas and Elcazar, high-priests; and Samuel.
2602 1312 Samul, for the family of David.

1363* The authentic vel. 2940 1055 Samuel, Nathan, and records of the Jew. Lel... 103 Cad. I Chr. xxix.

ish nation, compiled hicles. 1015 29. X

under the inspection ef Sol, 1013 So, 1 hen young.

of the Kings and * I-X1.300) 1004 Na han, lode, I Chr.

High-priests by in. T-IX. (01001? ix. 29. 33

spired men, Proph19... 3004 1000 Solim ,ur. Lemue.

es, and others, par. iastes 30,20 971 Solmon, when old.

ticularly by Ezra, who revised

the

whole, XIL*C, 3:07 907

3142 62 Jonah, at Nine:eh, against the city. 32011 800 in Judea, against corruptions. 3217 78 7 dnor, do,

do. 3254750 Meah, . do.

do. 3261 740 Hoten, .. do.

do. 3291 713 Visfrum, . do.

do. 3300 Isaiah, at Jerusalem, do. jah. 630 Zephaniah, do

do. 3375 6.0 Habakkuk, do.

do. 1. &e. 3581 623 The records continued by direction of Heco

3414 590 kiab. h 3116 540 S Joan ah, in Judea and Jerusalem, against ations 13416 548 > Judah, Extpt, and other nations.

3117 5971011an, in Julea, a gainst Nineveh. 3120 574 Furiel, at Babylon, during the captivity. 1300 53. Dan

do.

... do. 214 520 Hoyeri, A Jerusalem, after the relcro from 3197 520 Zacariah, the captivity; encouraging the 3495 504) Ezra

returned Jews to build ihe tem 3517 407 Ezra

ple and city--with the record of uh

3970 431 Nehemiah, the labors to restore the state
3607) 3971 Dinlachi, and purify the people.
At various times: David, Solomon, Asaph, the sons of

Kuran, &c.

« PreviousContinue »