Martin Faber: The Story of a Criminal and Other Tales, Volume 2

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Contents

I
3
II
37
III
91
IV
119
V
151
VI
205
VII
231
VIII
257

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Page 3 - Thou hast most traitorously corrupted ' the youth of the realm, in erecting a .grammar* ' school: and whereas, before, our fore-fathers had ' no other books but the score and the tally, thou 'hast caused printing to be used; and, contrary ' to the king, his crown, and dignity, thou hast ' built a paper-mill. It will be proved to thy face; ' that thou hast men about thee, that usually talk ' of a noun, and a verb; and such abominable ' words, as no Christian ear can endure to heaf.
Page 260 - Drink, and forget the false, in firmer love ! Oh, give me of those waters ! Let me haste To dwell upon their verdant banks, and find, Upon my fever'd lips, a fresher taste, And a new feeling for my baffled mind. Oh, let me all forget ! — the dreary hours, The faithless love, the fond, unfruitful dreams Reposing on its banks of living flowers, And quaffing freely of its sacred streams.
Page 259 - Hadst thou in thy heart Some pregnant fancy, which became, at length, Of thy own spirit and wild sense a part, Born at thy birth and strengthening with thy strength— And did stern Time, and still relentless Truth, Rob thee of thy delusion, when late years Had taught thee what a credulous thing is youth 7 — Drink of these waters and forget thy tears. Had...
Page 259 - Had the stern Fortune interposed to blast The growing buds of Nature, and to burst The sacred mould in which twin hearts are cast, Each wedded to the other from the first, — Or was she false, who pledged herself to be, Even to the last, through every change, to prove The witness of a deathless faith to thee...
Page 258 - ... story. The tradition itself is lovely in the extreme, and will, doubtless, be one day made available by some high genius, who shall link its golden promises to the richest strains of harmony and romance. 'Twas a fond dream among the Portuguese, Those rovers of old ocean, that, afar, Embosom'd in the calm of Indian seas, And hallow'd by some sweet and singular star, There murmur'd ever forth a cooling wave, Whose waters, troubled not by human strife, By the kind Destinies ordain'd to save, Bcqueath'd,...
Page 258 - Bequeath'd, to all who drank, perpetual life. Nor life alone — that narrow boon of breath, The nobler spirit learns so soon to scorn — That profitless flow of years which end in death, Ere yet the joy they labour for is born : — But, at that gracious fount, the broken heart, Each wreck'd...
Page 258 - By that i'alse star which blinded, still misled — Lo ! the good vessel finds the friendly shore, While lights, more bright and certain, shine o'erhead; — The pilgrim seeks, and gladdens at, that spring, Which the bland seasons, from their fruitful store, Crown with each blooming and each blessed thing, Hope ever dream'd, or rapture knew, before. A bird of beauty sings among the trees, A silver strain, inviting, ever sweet — The waters ripple in the murmuring breeze, That, to the minstrel, is...
Page 258 - A bird of beauty sings among the trees, A silver strain, inviting, ever sweet, — The waters ripple in the murmuring breeze, That, to the minstrel, is an echo meet. Their ditty is a soothing to the ear — The tale they murmur hath a power to calm The chiding pulse of love, the heart of fear, — And those sweet waters, they are full of balm. Was thy fond plan of boyhood, wild — untaught By sage experience and reflection cool ? — Did thy warm passions banish the true thought, Till, grown to...
Page 257 - THE belief which prevailę! amone the early adventurers of the Portuguese and Spanish nations, that there existed, somewhere among the recesses of the New World, a fountain, the waters of which, when drank from, had the virtue of giving perpetual youth to those who did so. has been made the subject of frequent story. The tradition itself is lovely in the extreme, and will, doubtless, be one day made available by some high genius, who shall link its golden promises to the richest strains of harmony...
Page 119 - ... offer us to-night. WONDERS OF THE SEA What I have brought thee is a mystery, Framed by a wondrous artist — of the sea — Of the green mansions, and the sparry caves, The shells, the sea-maids, and the warring waves; And stirring dangers; — of the fearful things, Monstrous and savage, that, from secret springs, Course, in pursuit of prey ; and, all night long, Keep wakeful but to hear the tempest's song, And join in terrible chorus! Would you hear? Then let your breath be hush'd, and bend...

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