Two Apologies, One for Christianity: In a Series of Letters Addressed to Edward Gibbon, Esq. The Other for the Bible, in Answer to Thomas Paine. To which are Added Two Sermons, and a Charge, in Defence of Revealed Religion

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Scatcherd and Letterman, 1816 - Apologetics - 470 pages
 

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Page 312 - peculiar earnestness—." And he that saw it, bare record, and his record is true ; and he knoweth that he saith true, that ye might believe."—John saw blood and water flowing from the wound; the blood is easily accounted for ; but whence came the water ? The anatomists tell us—that it came from the
Page 252 - extreme. Let us open the book, and see what kind of jests it contains ; take the very first as a specimen—" The fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge; but fools despise wisdom and instruction."—Do you perceive any jest in this ? The fear of the Lord! What Lord does Solomon mean
Page 198 - Thou shalt not muzzle the ox when he treadeth out the corn ;" and that this might not escape observation, they have noted it in the table of contents at the head of the chapter, though it is only a single verse of less than two lines. " O priests! priests! ye are willing to be compared to an ox for the sake of
Page 115 - we have the greatest reason to conclude, that they were eminently distinguished" * —Affirmabant autem, hanc fuisse summam vel culpse suse vel erroris, quod essent soliti stato die ante lucem convenire; carmenque Christo, quasi Deo, dicere secum invicem; seque sacramento non in scelus aliquod obstringere, sed ne furta, ne latrocinia, ne adulteria committerent, ne fidem fallerent, ne depositum appellati abnegarent: quibus peractis,
Page 242 - whose are the fathers, and of whom, as concerning the flesh, Christ came, who is over all, God blessed for ever. Amen." The history of the Old Testament has, without doubt, some difficulties in it; but a minute philosopher, who busies himself in searching them
Page 17 - for, when the law was declared to them from mount Sinai, all the people saw the thunderings, and the lightnings, and the noise of the tempest, and the mountains smoking ; and when the people saw it, they removed and stood afar off: and they said unto Moses, Speak thou with us, and we will hear ; but let not God speak with us, lest we
Page 270 - the eyes of Zedekiah, and bound him in chains, and carried him to Babylon, and put him in prison till the day of his death.' What can we say of these prophets, but that they are impostors and liars ?" I can say this—that the prophecy you have produced, was
Page 157 - of eternal life. It has God for its author, salvation for its end, and truth without any mixture of error for its matter*." I am, &c. * Locke's Posth. Works.
Page 285 - an angry opponent would say, in a style of extreme arrogance, and sottish self-sufficiency—" I have gone," you ' say, " through the Bible (mistaking here, as in other places, the Old Testament for the Bible) as a man would go through a wood, with an axe on his shoulders, and fell trees; here they lie;
Page 94 - darkness over all the land until the ninth hour ; St. Mark says—And when the sixth hour was come, there was darkness over the whole land until the ninth hour; St.

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