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OF THE

FOURTH ANNUAL MEETING

OF THE

WESTERN LITERARY INSTITUTE,

AND

COLLEGE OF PROFESSIONAL TEACHERS,

HELD IN CINCINNATI, OCTOBER, 1834.

Cincinnati:

PUBLISHED BY JOSIAH DRAKE.

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Entered according to act of Congress, in the year 1835, by ALBERT PICKET, Sen.,
in behalf of the Western Literary Institute, and College of Professional Teachers,
in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of Ohio.

Printed by James and Gazlay:
No. 1. Baker street,

Cincinnati.

PREFACE.

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The readers of this Volume may wish to know something of the history of the Institution, of which it is the offspring

The idea of the “College of Teachers," in its present form, was first cast in the "Academic Institute;" an institution of similar character, but more limited operations, established in 1829. The project was the work of Teachers, as may be easily imagined; but the sympathies of noble-minded and patriotic citizens, more ambitious of usefulness than fame, have been the animating cause of its permanence, and success. The first General Convention of the Teachers of the Western country was called in June, 1831, under the auspices of the “Academic Institute.” The proceedings and addresses were published in No. 1, of the Academic Pioneer. The second General Convention was held in October, 1832. “The College of Teachers” was embodied in a Constitution of its own, and officered. The proceedings have come only partially before the public; and although the addresses were replete with spirit and sense, and worthy of being more generally known, they have never been published. It was our poverty, and not our will, that consented to this failure.

The third General Convention took place in October, 1833. There was an increase of power and interest; and addresses of various descriptions were listened to by crowded audiences of intelligent citizens; but not more than a brief view of their proceedings appeared. Yet even this, when circulated through the western country, attracted general attention, and proved how warmly the cause was espoused. It found disinterested friends in every quarter.

Of the fourth Annual Convention of October last, we are able to present a more extended view, than we could of either of the two former. We are sensible, however, that this publication exhibits but imperfectly the most interesting features of that meeting. Words, especially written ones, are but dead images after all, of living things. We trust that impressions of a more glowing character are engraven on the memories of those who attended. Let not the utility of the “ College of Teachers” be judged of merely, by these apparent fruits:—its best effects are to be looked for in the improved understandings of rising generations. In the meantime, we trust that this volume

may

be the means of exciting some interest in the cause to which it is dedicated; and that the patriotic will read, not merely to censure or praise, but to practice and inculcate whatever herein may appear to them either good or commendable.

PUBLISHING COMMITTEE.

OF THE

COLLEGE OF PROFESSIONAL TEACHERS.

PART I.

MINUTES.

Cincinnati, Monday, October 6th, 1834. At 9 o'clock, A. M., “ The WESTERN LITERARY INSTITUTE and COLLEGE of PROFESSIONAL TEACHERS” commenced its fourth annual meeting, in the Hall of the Medical College of Ohio.

The President, ALBERT PICKET, Sen., of this city, assisted by Vice President, Rev. Elijah SLACK, D. D., of Oxford, took the chair, and called the Institute to order.

D. L. TALBOTT, the Recording Secretary, present, and officiating.

The President then proceeded to address the College, setting forth, more particularly, the objects for which it had been instituted; and the subjects which should occupy its attention. This address constitutes the lst Art. of part II, of this volume,

page 25.

After some time spent in registering the names of gentlemen in attendance upon the Convention, the College adjourned to the Methodist Protestant Church, to hear the first of the series of Discourses, which, by the arrangement of the Executive Committee were to be delivered before the public.

The Rev. S. W. LYND, officiated as Chaplain. The meeting was addressed by DANIEL DRAKE, M. D. of this city,“ On the Philosophy of Family, School and College Discipline:"-being too long for delivery at one time, leave was granted to conclude it at 9 o'clock in the evening; when the College adjourned.

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