The Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser, Volume 1

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William Pickering, 1839 - English poetry
 

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Page xxii - The Lord is the portion of mine inheritance and of my cup: Thou maintainest my lot. The lines are fallen unto me in pleasant places; yea, I have a goodly heritage.
Page 32 - He, making speedy way through spersed ayre, And through the world of waters wide and deepe, To Morpheus house doth hastily repaire. Amid the bowels of the earth full steepe, And low, where dawning day doth never peepe, His dwelling is ; there Tethys his wet bed Doth ever wash, and Cynthia still doth steepe In silver deaw his ever-drouping hed, Whiles sad Night over him her mantle black doth spred.
Page 22 - Joying to heare the birdes sweete harmony, Which, therein shrouded from the tempest dred, Seemd in their song to scorne the cruell sky. Much can they praise the trees so straight and hy, The sayling Pine...
Page li - The generall end, therefore, of all the booke, is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline...
Page 20 - A lovely Ladie rode him faire beside, Upon a lowly Asse more white then snow. Yet she much whiter ; but the same did hide Under a vele, that wimpled...
Page xxxix - THREE years she grew in sun and shower, Then Nature said, 'A lovelier flower On earth was never sown ! This child I to myself will take ; She shall be mine, and I will make A lady of my own. 'Myself will to my darling be Both law and impulse ; and with me The girl, in rock and plain, In earth and heaven, in glade and bower, Shall feel an overseeing power To kindle or restrain.
Page xxiii - If music and sweet poetry agree, As they must needs, the sister and the brother, Then must the love be great 'twixt thee and me, Because thou lov'st the one, and I the other. Dowland to thee is dear, whose heavenly touch Upon the lute doth ravish human sense ; Spenser to me, whose deep conceit is such, As, passing all conceit, needs no defence.
Page viii - Full little knowest thou, that hast not tride, What hell it is, in suing long to bide : To loose good dayes, that might be better spent; To wast long nights in pensive discontent; To speed to-day, to be put back to-morrow; To feed on hope, to pine with feare and sorrow...
Page lii - Arthure, before he was king, the image of a brave Knight, perfected in the twelve private Morall Vertues, as Aristotle hath devised...
Page 30 - the way to win Is wisely to advise: now day is spent; Therefore with me ye may take up your In For this same night.

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