Paradise Lost

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Barnes & Noble Classics, 2004 - Literary Criticism - 442 pages
6 Reviews
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Paradise Lost, by John Milton, is part of theBarnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics:
  • New introductions commissioned from today''s top writers and scholars
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  • Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events
  • Footnotes and endnotes
  • Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work
  • Comments by other famous authors
  • Study questions to challenge the reader''s viewpoints and expectations
  • Bibliographies for further reading
  • Indices & Glossaries, when appropriate
All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences--biographical, historical, and literary--to enrich each reader''s understanding of these enduring works.

As a young student, John Milton fantasized about bringing the poetic elocution of Homer and Virgil to the English language. Milton realized this dream with his graceful, sonorous Paradise Lost, now considered the most influential epic poem in English literature.

A retelling of the biblical story of mankind''s fall from grace, Milton''s epic opens shortly after the dramatic expulsion of Satan and his army of angels from Heaven. What follows is a cosmic battle between good and evil that ranges across vast, splendid tracts of time and space, from the wild abyss of Chaos and the fiery lake of Hell to the Gate of Heaven and God''s newly created paradise, the Garden of Eden. Controversy still swirls around Milton''s magnificent and sympathetic characterization of Satan, a portrait so compelling that many critics have maintained that he is the true hero of the story. David Hawkes is Associate Professor of English at Lehigh University. His books include Idols of the Marketplace (2001) and Ideology (second edition, 2003), and he has contributed articles to The Nation, the Times Literary Supplement, and the Journal of the History of Ideas.

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Great Book

User Review  - kari27 - Overstock.com

The book is great. It is unabridged and in great condition. At the bottom of each page there is a minidictionary explaining the literary terms etc. Great buy for the price! Read full review

Review: Paradise Lost

User Review  - Karen Armstrong - Goodreads

I love Milton. He's such a crazy awesome rebel dude with an ego the size of east Texas. Paradise Lost is a blast to read because of this, and so much fun to dissect. I recommend it to anyone who likes Christian mythology. Read full review

Contents

The World of John Milton and Paradise Lost
ix
Contents Book I
9
Book IV
105
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

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About the author (2004)

David Hawkes is Associate Professor of English at Lehigh University. His books include Idols of the Marketplace (2001) and Ideology (second edition, 2003), and he has contributed articles to The Nation, the Times Literary Supplement, and the Journal of the History of Ideas.

Bibliographic information