The Epic of Gilgamesh: The Babylonian Epic Poem and Other Texts in Akkadian and Sumerian

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Andrew George
Penguin, Dec 31, 2002 - Fiction - 228 pages
Originally the work of an anonymous Babylonian poet who lived more than 3,700 years ago, The Epic of Gilgamesh tells of the heroic exploits of the ruler of the walled city of Uruk. Not content with the immortality conveyed by the renown of his great deeds, Gilgamesh journeys to the ends of the earth and beyond in his search for eternal life, encountering the wise man Uta-napishti, who relates the story of a great flood that swept the earth. This episode and several others in the epic anticipate stories in the Bible and in Homer, to the great interest of biblical and classical scholars. Told with intense feeling and imagination, this masterful tale of love and friendship, duty and death, is more than an object of scholarly concern; it is a vital rendering of universal themes that resonate across the ages and is considered the world's first truly great work of literature.

 

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User Review  - AlexandraSeaha - LibraryThing

As a history buff, I proudly rated the Epic of Gilgamesh a 5/5. Since the author(s) is long dead and unknown, I don’t expect much blowback. This story is really timeless and while it has a niche ... Read full review

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User Review  - ritaer - LibraryThing

It is rather confusing that this page displays reviews of multiple renderings and translations of the eipic. This review is of the version by David Ferry. It is hard to judge when I have not read any ... Read full review

Contents

IX
1
XIII
12
XIV
22
XV
30
XVI
39
XVII
47
XVIII
54
XIX
62
XXX
122
XXXII
127
XXXIV
128
XXXV
132
XXXVII
135
XXXVIII
138
XXXIX
139
XL
141

XX
70
XXI
75
XXII
88
XXIII
100
XXIV
101
XXV
107
XXVI
115
XXVII
116
XXVIII
118
XXIX
119
XLI
143
XLII
149
XLIII
166
XLIV
175
XLV
195
XLVI
209
XLVII
222
XLVIII
226
Copyright

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Page xxxvi - Live joyfully with the wife whom thou lovest all the days of the life of thy vanity, which he hath given thee under the sun all the days of thy vanity: for that is thy portion in this life, and in thy labour which thou takest under the sun.
Page xxxvi - But you, Gilgamesh, let your belly be full, enjoy yourself always by day and by night! Make merry each day, dance and play day and night! 'Let your clothes be clean, let your head be washed, may you bathe in water! Gaze on the child who holds your hand, let your wife enjoy your repeated embrace!
Page xxxiv - O my friends; a visitant Is knocking his dire summons at my door, The like of whom, to scare me and to daunt, Has never, never come to me before; 'Tis death,— O loving friends, your prayers!— 'tis he!
Page xxiii - I am the first man to read that after more than two thousand years of oblivion." Setting the tablet on the table, he jumped up and rushed about the room in a great state of excitement, and, to the astonishment of those present, began to undress himself!
Page xxiii - Smith took the tablet and began to read over the lines which Ready had brought to light; and when he saw that they contained the portion of the legend he had hoped to find there, he said, "I am the first man to read that after more than two thousand years of oblivion.
Page xxxiv - Ur-shanabi, climb Uruk's wall and walk back and forth! Survey its foundations, examine the brickwork! Were its bricks not fired in an oven? Did the Seven Sages not lay its foundations?
Page li - SN KRAMER, Schooldays ; A Sumerian Composition Relating to the Education of a Scribe, Journal of the American Oriental Society, 69 (1949), pp.

About the author (2002)

Andrew George is Reader in Assyriology at SOAS (the School of Oriential and African Studies) in London, and is also an Honorary Lecturer at the University's Institute of Archaeology. His research has taken him many times to Iraq to visit Babylon and other ancient sites, and to museums in Baghdad, Europe and North America to read the original clay tablets on which the scribes of ancient Iraq wrote.

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