The Natural Genesis

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Cosimo, Inc., Oct 1, 2007 - History - 544 pages
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Egyptologist Gerald Massey challenged readers in A Book of the Beginnings to consider the argument that Egypt was the birthplace of civilization and that the widespread monotheistic vision of man and the metaphysical was, in fact, based on ancient Egyptian mythos. In The Natural Genesis, Massey delivers a sequel, delving deeper into his compelling polemic. Volume II provides detailed discourse on the Egyptian origin of the delicate components of the monotheistic creed. With his agile prose, Massey leads an adventurous examination of the epistemology of astronomy, time, and Christology-and what it all means for human culture. British author GERALD MASSEY (1828-1907) published works of poetry, spiritualism, Shakespearean criticism, and theology, but his best-known works are in the realm of Egyptology, including A Book of the Beginnings and Ancient Egypt: The Light of the World.

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Contents

SECTION
1
Astronomical Nature of MythologyMystery of the Seven StarsCreation
92
Gods as Intelligencers in TimeThe True GodsKeepers of the Covenant
170
Assyrian Deluge LegendThe Deluge of TimeEnd of a Period not of a World
199
Modes of identifying Time by various Seasons and keeping tbem as Festivals
377
VOCABULARY
507
INDEX
523
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Page 264 - The mystery of the seven stars which thou sawest in my right hand, and the seven golden candlesticks. The seven stars are the angels of the seven churches : and the seven candlesticks which thou sawest are the seven churches.
Page 125 - Unto Adam also and to his wife did the LORD God make coats of skins, and clothed them.
Page 79 - For there are some eunuchs, which were so born from their mother's womb: and there are some eunuchs, which were made eunuchs of men: and there be eunuchs, which have made themselves eunuchs for the kingdom of heaven's sake. He that is able to receive it, let him receive it.
Page 470 - Verily, verily, I say unto you, If a man keep my saying, he shall never see death.
Page 156 - The condition of man, after the fall of Adam, is such, that he cannot turn and prepare himself, by his own natural strength and good works, to faith, and calling upon God : wherefore we have no power to do good works pleasant and acceptable to God, without the grace of God by Christ preventing us, that we may have a good will, and working with us, when we have that good will.
Page 413 - For he is our peace, who hath made both one, and hath broken down the middle wall of partition between us, having abolished in his flesh the enmity, even the law of commandments contained in ordinances ; for to make in himself of twain one new man, so making peace ; and that he might reconcile both unto God in one body by the cross, having slain the enmity thereby.
Page 419 - Give me to drink. (For his disciples were gone away unto the city to buy meat.) Then saith the woman of Samaria unto him, How is it that thou, being a Jew, askest drink of me, which am a woman of Samaria 1 for the Jews have no dealings with the Samaritans.
Page 372 - And the Father himself, which hath sent me, hath borne witness of me. Ye have neither heard his voice at any time, nor seen his shape.
Page 113 - And there appeared a great wonder in heaven; a woman clothed with the sun, and the moon under her feet, and upon her head a crown of twelve stars: And she being with child cried, travailing in birth, and pained to be delivered.

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