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DRIVE

RIVE the frown from thy brow, from thine eye chase the tear, And again let thy smile mildly beaming appear ; For the sighs of despondence thy bosom that heave Only add to the sorrows they seek to relieve. 0! wouldst thou that life should appear as to youth, When the vision of hope seemed the promise of truth, When each feeling exulting was quick with delight, And each thought of the future unclouded and bright 0! wouldst thou to thee such expectance were given, Enjoy it, 'tis thine, 'tis the prospect of heaven!

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EXTRACT*

From the valedictory oration delivered by Mr. Eliot at the

Commencement of Harvard University, August, 1812, when his class were graduated as Masters of Arts.

The following mention of Mr. Buckminster, and an allusion to the late Dr. Eckley and Mr. Emerson, were introduced in an address to the Governor of the commonwealth, and the Overseers of the college, of whose body they were members.

Sed dum vos aspicio, non sedes vacatas morte lugebo? Simeon non est-Josephus mortuus est,et Benjamin quoque eripitur. Heu magna lux nostra abest! Ille abest, qui quondam nec temere nec timide in omni pro litteris aut religione inter primos incessit ! Certe manent qui bona et grandia volunt agere et agent-sed ubi est alter Buckminster? Gloria nobis fuit ! Ingens inter nos emicuit! Nobis manent desideri. um, et memoria, et exemplum ejus: et restat etiam, ut, cum ille ereptus est, amicitia et consiliis arctius conjungeremur,

viribus nostris omnium bonorum damnum omnes supplere conemur.

et pro

First published in the General Repository, for October, 1812. vol. ii. p. 313.

PART II.

)

CONTAINING PIECES NOT BEFORE PUBLISHED.

SERMON I.

ON THE VALUE OF OUR REASON, AND ITS COINCIDENCE WITH

REVELATION IN WHAT IT TEACHES AND REQUIRES.

JOB xxxii. 8.

THERE IS A SPIRIT IN MAN, AND THE INSPIRATION OF THE ALMIGHTI

GIVETH THEM UNDERSTANDING.

The expressions of God's benevolence to us his creatures are so numerous, that it is seldom that we recollect him as the author of all our blessings. When our lives are preserv. ed from any great danger, when we escape from any great evil which appeared unavoidable, or when we unexpectedly come into possession of any great good, the most thoughtless of us will thank God, and almost unconsciously acknowledge the important truth of our entire dependence. upon him. But that the air we breathe is wholesome, that to supply our bodily wants affords us pleasure, are equal proofs of his care and love, with what may appear to us remarkable providencies, or uncommon interpositions. Every motion of our bodies, or exercise of our minds, is a gource of admiration to the philosopher, and may be a proof of the most benevolent design to the pious man.

Of all the gifts of God to us, there is none which deserves our most perfect gratitude more than that of reason. By this we are elevated above other creatures, and made to resemble superior intelligences; and it is this which conforms our na

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