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well, and am prepared to affirm that he is a capital fellow. He is fond of a bit of fun. He can laugh, and jump, and sing with the merriest. He is clever, but not puffed up with conceit. He has but little of French polish about him, but he has a goodly quantity of English oak. If you try in any way to test bis real worth, like men try shillings and sovereigns, you will find that he has the ring of genuine coin. He has an honest open look, a true and fearless tongue, a sound and noble heart. I have often admired his diligence when at his lessons; bis wakeful interest in what is said to him; his industry and energy in whatever he puts his hand to; and, to crown all, I have been unspeakably pleased to see in him the marks of a true Christian disciple. Although he has not seen more than thirteen summers, I believe he has begun to serve the Lord Jesus. I have seen his face beam with joy while listening to the story of our Saviour's love and beauty. I have seen his eye moistened with tears when bis ear has drunk in the story of our Saviour's agony and shame. Frank knows his Bible well, and when questioned concerning the contents of that best of books bis answers are prompt and intelligent. He has the rare privilege of having an exceedingly good man for his father, and a gentle, prayerful woman for his mother. He reverences and loves them, and they think a world of him. Let us pray that he may fulfil their brightest expectations.

XXVII.-RUTI CHEERFUL. This carte is last in our album, but it is not the least worthy and valuable. The girl it faintly and dimly represents is just one of the sweetest and bonniest girls I ever met with. Like Frank Sterling she is blessed with good Christian parents. In this respect she has the advantage over poor Mary Sorrowful, the drunkard's child, whose likeness I called your attention to some months ago. Mary is now in heaven, Ruth is still living, and is the pride of her parents, the joy of her teacher, and the friend of her pastor. Men of science tell us about “ bottled-up sunshine " hidden deep in the earth in coal-beds. Well, there is a lot of sunshine in Ruth, but it is not bottled

up,

it bursts forth, brims over-beams in her eyes, rings in her voice, shines on her pathway. She “carries music in her heart;" “scatters sunbeams” by her smiles and deeds. Her obedience is cheerful. The commands of her parents and teachers have no need to be repeated, and followed by threats and blows in tears. She obeys readily and gladly. When asked to get her lessons, she does not shake herself-do you?—and whine and weep. When sent on errands, she does not curl her lips, hang down her eyelids, and say, in whimpering tones, “I don't want to go; on the contrary, she says quickly, “Yes, Ma," “ Yes, Ma, I will go,” and she does go and is soon back again ; love impels her, and nothing impels like true affection.

'Tis love that makes her cheerful feet

In swift obedience move."

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ADDRESSES FOR JUVENILE MISSIONARY MEETINGS.

327

Ruth is a beautiful girl ; she has not only beauty of form, feature, and expression—the light and purity within shine out in her lovely face. She, too, is a disciple of Jesus. She has given herself to Him who is the rose of Sharon, the lily of the valley; it is this which gives the richest bloom and sweetest fragrance to her character and life. Ruth, though young, has made a wise and noble choice. She has chosen God for her Father, Christ for Friend and Saviour. Will you, my dear reader, at once, deliberately and heartily, make this blessed choice ?

Now, in closing this album, let me assure you that the characters which have been sketched in this homely chit-chat fashion are not merely imaginary persons. They are honest, though imperfect, descriptions of persons whom I have met with. Some in one county, some in another, some in small country schools, some in large town schools. For many years I have taken a deep and growing interest in Sunday schools. I have mingled freely both with teachers and scholars ; watched somewhat closely the work in the class, the committee-room, and in the teachers' meeting; I have made myself acquainted with the names and faces of the teachers and scholars ; consequently it has been no very difficult thing for me to call up the various likenesses which have during twenty years been photographed upon my mind and heart

And why have I taken this interest in Sunday-school work? Partly because of the vast debt I ‘owe to the Sunday school. No writer for the JUVENILE INSTRUCTOR, and no reader of it, owes to the Sunday school a larger debt than I do. That debt, as far as possible, I would most cheerfully pay. I rejoice to think that the higher mission of the Sunday school is being more vividly realised and powerfully felt. Never before was so much done in our country to gather the young into the fuld of Christ as is being done now ; but still there is room for improvement, and if all our teachers will try to become like John Winsome, Miss Neverfail, and Daniel Neverflinch, and all our scholars like Frank Sterling and Ruth Cheerful, what a blessed change we shall soon see in our country!

ADDRESSES FOR JUVENILE MISSIONARY

MEETINGS.

IV.
DEAR FRIENDS, I've a duty that's not very light,

But it's needful I think you'll admit;
And if you will grant me a few minutes' grace,
I will treat of

finances a bit.
Though “money's the root of all evil,” folks say,

It is also the means of much good ;
Without it the grandest of movements would fail,

And send missions without it who could ?

328

ADDRESSES FOR JUVENILE MISSIONARY MEETINGS.

You have heard what we're doing in Mission'ry work

In our various stations abroad,
And will freely admit that to carry it on

Great expenses must needs be incurred.
Nearly five thousand pounds were expended last year

In our own Mission'ry enterprise ;
And this year I doubt not much more will be spent,

For each year the cost seems to rise.
Towards this outlay our Society here

Has yearly subscribed a fair sum,
And in order to send it as usual this year

To you for assistance we come.
Now, do not refuse us, and say “trade is bad;

We know it-we've heard it before :
None hear of bad trade so soon as do those

Who for charity plead at the door.
Tis because trade is bad that we eagerly ask

For your help in the meeting to-night,
Since from boxes and cards, as you heard it read out,

The proceeds have proved very light.
Our Mission'ry boxes have only caught pence

Where aforetime a sixpence was got ;
And young Johonie's pennies to ha'pennies have shrunk,

And Billy has his quite forgot.
The cards too have realised less than they did ;

It was really hard work to collect,
For nobody seemed to possess any change,

And silver we could not expect.
Some gave us their pence with a bright cheerful smile,

Some grumbled—but gave, into that,
Some

gave all they could—an encouraging word,
And some seemed to grudge even that,
So to you we must look to raise the amount

As near to last year's as you will,
And even if more than that sum should be raised,

There'll be room in the Mission'ry till.
We don't ask a penny

that
you cannot

spare,
Just give as your means will permit;
Lut perhaps there are some whom bad trade don't affect,
If so, friends, just help us a bit.

Toy BROWN.

SUNDAY-SCHOOL DEPARTMENT.

04

SCRIPTURE LESSONS FOR SUNDAY SCHOOLS.

DECEMBER.

SUBJECT.

FOR READING.

MORNING SUBJECTS.

Golden Texts

for Repetition. FOURTH QUARTER. 2 Spies sent out..

Num. xiii. 1-3, 17-33] 1 Cor. x. 11. 9 Israel's Unbelief..

Num. xiv.1-10,26-31] Heb. iv. 11. 16 Moses' Last Blessing..... Deut. xxxiii. 23 The End of a Noble Life Deut. xxxiv. Rom. xiv. 8. 30 God's Mercies to Israel. Ps. lxxviii. 1-8,25-39] Ps. ciii. 2.

ver. 27.

FOR READING,

2

AFTERNOON SUBJEOTS.

Golden Texts
SUBJECT.
|

for Repetition.
FOURTH QUARTER.
The Deliverance...... Acts xxvii. 27–44 Ps. cvii. 30.
Paul in Melita ............ Acts xxviii. 1—15. Rom. i. 14.
Paul at Rome .................

Acts xxviii. 16-31. Rom. i. 16.
Paul's Last Words......... 2 Tim. iv. 1-18...

ver. 7.
Review of the Quarter's Lessons

Phil. iii. 7.

16 23 30

Poetry.

PRACTICAL PROVERBS.
VIRTUE ne'er dwells within that heart
Where shame has ceased to hold' a part.
Whene'er a good man comes to thee
Examine not his pedigree.
'Tis by his deeds and not his gown
A pious man may best be known.
If you a gentleman would know,
'Tis he whose deeds proclaim him so.
A word's a thing that flies away,
But writing may be made to stay.
If youth had wisdom, age had

power,
Naught would be wanting for an hour.
You ne'er should say, and ne'er should do,
The word and deed wrath prompts you to.
Folly and anger are the same,
The difference is but in the name,
He who once proves himself a knave
Doth seldom change this side the grave.
To others pardon e'er bestow,
But to thyself no mercy show.

INDEX.

MISCELLANEOUS.

113

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PAGE
A ddresses for Juvenile Missionary
Meetings-I.

75
Addresses for Juvenile Missionary
Meetings-II.

130
Addresses for Juvenile" Missionary

232
Addresses for Juvenile Missionary
Meetings-IV.

327
Brave, Two, Boys

83
Cat, A, Waiting for its Ship

307
Chi dren's Book-Shelf
Clay Cross Missionary Meeting
Clear, A, Definition

219
Compinionship (with an Engraving)
Cripple, The, Büy (with an Engrav-
ing)

114
Dogs, Have, Intelligence ? (with an
Engraving)..

86
Editor, The, To His Readers

310
Gathered Lambs

160

PAGE
George the Fourth at Holyrood

216
Happy, A, New Year

4
Harvest Home (with an Engraving).. 258
Industrious, An, Girl

168
Little, A, Boy

20
Making a Garland
Mother and Children (with an Ëngrav-
ing)

.20, 51

307

2

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282
Nearest, Our, Planetary Neighbour 218
Plays Like a Christian

74
Priz-s, Our (with an Engraving)

78
Rabbit, The Dead (with an Engraving) 142
Ruth's Good Fortune

275
Sea, The, side (with an Engraving)

226
Spring Flowers (with an Engraving).. 30
Stepping, The, stone (with an Engrav-
ing).

198
Wild Flowers

249
Winter, Birds in (with an Engraving) 311

BEN BARLOW'S BUDGET.

4, 31, 58, 87, 115, 143, 170, 199, 227, 256, 283, 313

FOOTPRINTS OF GOD IN NATURE,


XI, Animals ..
XII. The Lion
XIII. The Elephant
XIV. The Tiger ..
XV. The Camel
XVI. The Monkey

15
35
62
96
122
147

XVII. The Beaver
XVIII. The Ass
XIX. The Dog

XX. The Horse
XXI. Oxen
XXII. The Sheep

175
207
234
265
290
318

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