Page images
PDF
EPUB
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

1880]

THE KABUL-KANDAHAR FIELD FORCE

475 the number of animals that could be allotted to the column, which was necessarily limited, as carriage had to be provided simultaneously for the withdrawal of the rest of the army of occupation.

The strength of the force placed at my disposal consisted of 9,986 men of all ranks and eighteen guns, divided into three brigades of Infantry, one brigade of Cavalry, and three batteries of Mountain Artillery. There were, besides, over 8,000 followers* and 2,300 horses and gun-mules.

It was designated the Kabul-Kandahar Field Force.

Major-General J. Ross, C.B., was given the command of the Infantry division, his three Brigadier-Generals being Herbert Macpherson, T. D. Baker, and Charles Macgregor. Brigadier-General Hugh Gough commanded the Cavalry brigade; Colonel Alured Johnson the Artillery; while Colonel E. Perkins held the position of Commanding Royal Engineer; Deputy-Surgeon-General J. Hanbury that of Principal Medical Officer; and Lieutenant-Colonel E. F. Chapman, Chief of the Staff.

From the detail of the force given below,† it will be seen that there

[blocks in formation]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

+ DETAIL OF FORCE.

1ST INFANTRY BRIGADE.

92nd Highlanders

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

24th Punjab Native Infantry

575

2nd Gurkhas

[blocks in formation]

72nd Highlanders
2nd Sikh Infantry
3rd Sikh Infantry
5th Gurkhas

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[graphic]

[1880

= was not in pro

s was my own

s, but, after due untain batteries.

-ould be able to = place with the

ish. Native.

[blocks in formation]

least possible delay, and wheeled Artillery would, in a country where there were practically no roads, have only prevented our moving as rapidly as we might otherwise have done.

For the equipment of the force, inclusive of carriage for footsore soldiers and followers, and allowing ten per cent. spare, more than 8,000+ animals were required.

Fortunately, it turned out that a fair amount of Indian corn in the ear was almost everywhere procurable, which was so nutritious that a large majority of the Cavalry horses and transport animals reached Kandahar in excellent condition.

Throughout the march great difficulties were experienced in procuring food, but they were always overcome, with the able assistance of Major Hastings and his political staff, and by means of the admirable arrangements made by the Commissariat§ and Transport || officers, who were quite untiring, and after the longest march, and with the prospect of having to start again at an early hour the following morning, had often to work far into the night. The want of fuel was our chief drawback. We had on many occasions to purchase houses and pull them to pieces for the sake of the wood to be got out of them, and frequently there was nothing to cook * British troops were allowed ponies at the rate of 2 per cent. of strength. Native troops were allowed ponies at the rate of 23 per cent of strength. Followers were allowed ponies at the rate of 14 per cent. of strength.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][ocr errors][merged small][subsumed]
[blocks in formation]

ponies.

Number of animals that

left Kabul

2,562 7,151

273

Purchased during the

Number of animals that

[blocks in formation]

march2

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

18

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

march

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

Major E. Hastings, Captain West Ridgeway, Major Euan Smith, C.S.I., and Major M. Prothero.

S Major A. Badcock, Captain A. Rind, and Lieutenants C. Fitzgerald, H. Hawkes, and H. Lyons Montgomery, all of the Bengal Staff Corps.

Lieutenant-Colonel R. Low, Bengal Staff Corps; Captain W. Wynter, 33rd Foot; Captains G. H. Eliot and C. R. Macgregor, Bengal Staff Corps; Lieutenants L. Booth, 33rd Foot, H. Elverson, 2nd Foot, R. Fisher, 10th Hussars, R. Wilson, 10th Hussars, and C. Robertson, 8th Foot.

[blocks in formation]
[graphic]
« PreviousContinue »