The Triflers: Consisting of Trifling Essays, Trifling Anecdotes, and a Few Poetical Trifles

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author's executrix, and sold, 1805 - English poetry - 177 pages
 

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Page 6 - Sir, (quoth the lawyer,) not to flatter ye, You have as good and fair a battery As heart can wish, and need not shame The proudest man alive to claim...
Page 26 - Can the Ethiopian change his skin, or the leopard his spots ? then may ye also do good, that are accustomed to do evil.
Page 72 - This quality of looking forward into futurity seems the unavoidable condition of a being whose motions are gradual, and whose life is progressive ; as his powers are limited, he must use means for the attainment of his ends, and intend first what he performs last ; as by continual advances from his first stage of existence, he is perpetually varying the horizon of his prospects, he must always discover new motives of action, new excitements of fear...
Page 12 - ... a myrtle wreath to the second, and a sprig of myrtle to the third. These were then usually presented, by the successful candidate, to some lady who wore them in her hair or her bosom, the next evening, to the publick rooms.
Page 62 - Weft, for the use of the disaffected in this part of England, ('who were supposed to have projected an insurrection, in order to co-operate with that in Scotland and the north of England) Mr. Allen communicated this to general Wade : who was then quartered with troops at Bath, and who...
Page 12 - Miller, once in a for'tnight, gave out a suba subject for poetical composition ; on which, when the company were assembled, those whom the Muses, or perhaps vanity, or the love of fame had influenced, produced their performances, and put them into an elegant antique marble vase brought from Rome, and placed on a pedestal in the bow window : when the company were seated, some young nymph put in her delicate arm, and took out a single poem, which the author, or some one who either had, or fancied he...
Page 42 - twill bring? " I shall add but one particular more; which is, that my scheme would most certainly provide for the poor, and that by an infallible (perhaps the only infallible) method, by removing the rich. Where there are no rich, there will of consequence be found no poor? for Providence hath in...
Page 12 - ... perhaps vanity, or the love of fame, had influenced, produced their performances, and put them into an elegant antique marble vase brought from Rome, and placed on a pedestal in the bow window ; when the company were seated, some young nymph put in her delicate arm and took out a single poem, which the author, or some one who either had, or fancied he had, an agreeable elocution, read to the assembly. When in this manner the whole collection was gone through, the gentlemen retired into a contiguous...
Page 65 - Allen, where he often breakfafted or drank tea, with his moft intimate friends. Prior Park commands a noble view of the city of Bath and its surrounding hills, covered with beautiful buildings, and is itself reciprocally a beautiful object to many parts of the city of Bath. The pleasure ground of Prior Park, though not extensive, is beautifully romantic, and good use is made of the various rills of water which appear to issue from a rock, ftricken by the wand of Moses, (a ftatue of...
Page 72 - ... powers are limited, he must use means for the attainment of his ends, and intend first what he performs last ; as by continual advances from his first stage of existence, he is perpetually varying the horizon of his prospects, he must always discover new motives of action, new excitements of fear, and allurements of desire.

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