A Handbook to Winnipeg and the Province of Manitoba: Prepared for the 76th Annual Meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1909, with Notes on Some of the Chief Points to be Visited on the Western Excursion

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Page 283 - Look at this delicate plant that lifts its head from the meadow, See how its leaves all point to the north, as true as the magnet ; It is the compass-flower, that the finger of God has suspended Here on its fragile stalk, to direct the traveller's journey Over the sea-like, pathless, limitless waste of the desert.
Page 133 - The first or lowest piairie-level is that of the Red River valley, of which the northern part is occupied by the Winnipeg group of lakes, its average elevation being about 800 feet above the sea, although gradually rising to the southward, along the axis of the valley, till it reaches a height of 960 feet about 200 miles to the south of the International boundary. Its area in Canada is about 55,000 square miles, including the lakes, and to the south of Lake Winnipeg it comprises some 7,000 square...
Page 7 - Straits, together with all the lands, countries and territories upon the coasts and confines of the seas, straits, bays, lakes, rivers, creeks and sounds aforesaid, which are not now actually possessed by any of our subjects, or by the subjects of any other Christian Prince or State...
Page 149 - Manitoba. — The province of Manitoba is almost in the centre of the continent, about midway between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, and also midway between the gulf of Mexico and the Arctic sea. It is many hundreds of miles distant from any high mountains, and there are no important water areas to the westward. The topographical features of the province are not pronounced. About two-thirds of the total area, including the basins of Lakes Winnipeg and Manitoba, are at a level of less than 1,000...
Page 7 - Navarre, I take possession of this place, Sainte Marie du Saut, as also of Lakes Huron and Superior, the Island of Manitoulin, and all countries, rivers, lakes, and streams contiguous and adjacent thereunto — both those which have been discovered and those which may be discovered hereafter, in all their length and breadth, bounded on the one side by the seas of the North and of the West, and on the other by the South Sea...
Page 123 - The striking features of the Laurentian Plateau are innumerable lakes, large and small, with intervening rounded rocky elevations, wooded, in their natural conditions to the south, rising above the tree line to the northward, while in the far north, on both sides of Hudson Bay, hills and valleys become eventually characterized by grasses, mosses and lichens alone, constituting the great "barren lands" of North America. The rivers and lakes are everywhere well stocked with fish, while deer and moose...
Page 122 - Although it is appropriate to describe this region as a plateau or table-land, such terms, it must be understood, are applicable only in a very general way. Its average elevation of about 1,500 feet is notably greater than that of the adjacent lands, and is maintained with considerable regularity, but its surface is nearly everywhere hummocky or undulating. Away from its borders, the streams draining it are, as a rule, extremely irregular and tortuous, flowing from lake to lake in almost every direction...
Page 279 - For some time past, the old world has been fed from the new. The scarcity which you have felt would have been a desolating famine, if this child of your old age, with a true filial piety, with a Roman charity, had not put the full breast of its youthful exuberance to the mouth of its exhausted parent.
Page 153 - ... inches fell during the May to August period. Most of the summer rainfall occurs in thunderstorms, which at times are quite heavy, accompanied by violent squalls and, less frequently, by hail. It is but very seldom that these storms attain the energy of the tornado, which is not uncommon on the more heated prairies to the south. The snowfall of the Manitoba ranges from 52 inches in the eastern districts to 44 inches in the western districts, and while the ground is usually well covered from December...
Page 34 - Thus, the classics and modern languages are taught in the four "affiliated" denominational colleges, St. Boniface (Roman Catholic), St. John's (Church of England), Manitoba College (Presbyterian), and Wesley College (Methodist...

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