Impressions of Theophrastus Such

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Classic Books, 1909
 

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Page 61 - ... particular case, as an example of the justice to be expected of the world. The companion usually allows for the bitterness of a disappointed man, and is secretly disinclined to believe that Grampus was to blame.
Page 70 - Blessed is the man who, having nothing to say, abstains from giving us wordy evidence of the fact.
Page 129 - Il ne faut point mettre un ridicule où il n'y en a point : c'est se gâter le goût, c'est corrompre son jugement et celui des autres. Mais le ridicule qui est quelque part , il faut l'y voir, l'en tirer avec grâce , et d'une manière qui plaise et qui instruise.
Page 253 - A significant indication of their natural rank is seen in the fact that at this moment, the leader of the Liberal party in Germany is a Jew, the leader of the Eepublican party in France is a Jew, and the head of the Conservative ministry in England is a Jew.
Page 238 - The eminence, the nobleness of a people, depends on its capability of being stirred by memories, and of striving for what we call spiritual ends — ends which consist not in immediate material possession, but in the satisfaction of a great feeling that animates the collective body as with one soul.
Page 250 - Irish need apply," parallels the sentence which for many polite persons sums up the question of Judaism — "I never didl&e.
Page 252 - Jew," is surely a fact to awaken admiration hi a mind capable of understanding what we may call the ideal forces in human history. And again, a varied, impartial observation of the Jews in different countries tends to the impression that they have a predominant kindliness which must have been deeply ingrained in the constitution of their race to have outlasted the ages of persecution and oppression. The concentration of their joys in domestic life has kept up in them the capacity of tenderness :...
Page 37 - ... barns where the old-fashioned flail once made resonant music, while the watch-dog barked at the timidly venturesome fowls making pecking raids on the outflying grain — the roofs that have looked out from among the elms and walnut-trees, or beside the yearly group of hay- and...
Page 38 - Nation of London." Why ? There have been many voluntary exiles in the world, and probably in the very first exodus of the patriarchal Aryans — for I am determined not to fetch my examples from races whose talk is of uncles and no fathers...

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