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THE

Connecticut Evangelical Magazine*

VOLUME i.

Consisting Of Twelve Numbers, To Be
Published Monthly.

FROM JULY 1800 TO JUNE 1801.

THE PROFITS ARISING FROM THE SALE OF THIS MAGAZ1NB
ARE DEVOTED TO FORM A PERMANENT FUND, THE AN-
NUAL INTEREST OF wHICH IS TO BE APPROPRIA-
TED, BY THE TRUSTEES OF THE MISSIONARY
SOCIETY OF CONNECTICUT, TO THE SUP-
PORT OF MISSIONS IN THE NEw
AMERICAN SETTLEMENTS, AND
AMONG THE HEATHEN.

THE FOLLOWING PERSONS ARE EDITORS OF THE WORK,
—VIZ.—
REVEREND MESSIEURS

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HARTFORD:
PRINTED BY HUDSON AND GOODWIN, FOR THE EDITORS.

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SHOULD this Magazine meet with the friendly patronage and encouragement of the public, it will be continued; and as the subscription papers, on which the terms of publication are expressed, are to be returned to the publishers, the Editors will annually publish thofe terms, in the sirst number for each year. They therefore in this sirst number insert a copy of the original subscription billsj which is followed by fome introductory remarks on the utility of such publications.

PROPOSALS lor printing a periodical Work, to be called, The

ConneS'tcut Evangelical Magazine;

TO CONTAIN

Essays on the doctrines of Christianity, and on religious, experimental and moral subjects :—Occasional remarks on the sulsilment of scripture prophecies in the present day, and expositions of difficult and doubtsul passages of scripture :—Religious intelligence concerning the state of Christ's kingdom, throughout the Christian world, and sketches of the original ecclesiastical concerns of this

country :—Information respecting Millions to the new settlements in the United States and among Heathen nations :—Narratives of revivals of religion in particular places together with the distinguishing marks of true and salse religion :—Accounts of remarkable dispensations of divine Providence :—Biographical sketches of perfons eminent for piety :—-Original hymns on evangelical subjects: —Together with whatever else on the subject of religion and morals may contribute to the advancement of genuine piety and pure morality.

This work will consist of original pieces and of extracts from the best European and American publications. As the Magazine is designed for the promotion of vital Christianity, and of a knowledge of the great and essential truths of the gnspel, Essays which are merely controversial ordeeply metaphysical, it will be seen, come not within the objectof this publication; nevertheless, should any such be sent which, in the opinion of the Editors, are highly meritorious, they will be admitted. The Magazine will be open to receive com

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munications from all denominations of Christians who believe in the peculiar principles of Christianity; but if written upon the distinguishing tenets of their respective sects, they will be excluded. The profits arising from the fale of this publication will be appropriated to the support of Missionaries to the Heathen or among the inhabitants of the new settlements.

The utility of such a work, is judiciously conducted, must be obvious to every well-wisher to the cause of religion and morality.— The Editors therefore flatter themselves, that the public will patronize a design whofe object is to convey religious knowledge ; to promote experimental piety and that practical godliness and true morality which are fo immediately conducive not only to the happiness of individuals, but to the welfare of fociety at large; to evince the pernicious tendency of modern irreligion ; and to raise an annual sum to gladden the hearts of our brethren in the wilderness with the preaching of the gnspel and the administration of Christian ordinances, and to spread the favor of the Redeemer's name among thofe who are perishing for lack of knowledge.

The Editors are induced to hope that their brethren in the ministry, and other literary characters, in this and the adjoining states, will forward the above design by communicating original pieces.

Hartford, April ^th, 1800.

N. B. As the prosits of this work are to be appropriated to charitable purpofes, it is particularly requested that all communications may come post free, addressed to the Editors, to the care of Messrs. Hudson & Goodwin.

CONDITIONS 01 PUBLICATION.

1. The Magazine will be published monthly—to be printed with a new type and on paper similar to that on which these proposals are issued.

2. Each number will contain at least 40 pages; the price to subscribers twelve cents and a half, to non-subscribers fourteen cents.

3. At the end of every year an index to the preceding twelve numbers will be given gratis.

4. Payment to be made on delivery of the books; but if any perfon of known ability will become responsible for 12 or more copies, three months time will be given him to collect the money and make payment; the evidence of which responsibility must be the perfon's acknowledging it by writing on the bill returned.

5. The publication will commence as foon as 400 copies shall be subscribed.

6. The publishers will give notice in the Connecticut CourAnt, when the sirst number will be ready for subscribers, which will probably be in June or July next.

*** Those who receive subscription papers are requested lo return them to Messrs. Hudfon £3° Goodwin, the intended publishers. Subscribers out of the state are requejled to diretl where their Magazines shall be sent to some principal town, either by water or the stages.

THE usefulness of periodical religious publications hath been long experienced, in the Christian churches of Europe. That fo sew attempts, of this kind, have been made in the American church hath arisen, neither from a desiciency of zeal and abilities, nor from a want of valuable matter in this country to form a monthly publication, which would be interesting to pious minds.

The religious as well as civil policy of this country, before the independence of the United States, drew all important communications to a central point acrofs the Atlantic i and a considerable period of time was necessary to change the current of intercourse, and bring the churches and clergy of the difserent states, to that mutual and extensive acquaintance, whereby proper matter for an Evangelical Magazine, may be regularly furnished. This dissiculty is continually becoming less, by a free and friendly intercourse between the northern and fouthern churches.

There is alfo in the public mind a growing considence in the abilities of American writers and divines to equal their European brethren in evangelical discussion. It Is become more easy to make a collection of such facts in the divine government of the church and in the experience of pious people, as will instruct the understanding and warm the heart.

The wonderful spirit of religious millions to heathen people, and to our new and scattered- settlements on the borders of the wilderness, which, within sive years, hath awoke both in Europe and America, furnishes much new and interesting matter. This spirit of love, to our distant and perishing sellow men, appears to have been the means of exciting a greater degree of btotherly love and more servent communion among thofe, who have long believed and rejoiced in our common Lord.

The abounding corruption of the present age in sentiment and practice, and the united efforts of thuse who hate pure Christianity,

have .been seen by the king of Zion, and he appears, in many ways, to be raising a standard against his enemieswhile they attempt to come in like a flood. He hath arisen and come forth from his place, and is bathing the sword of his justice in the blood of thofe who have most openly denied him, or idolatrously departed from the purity of the gnspel. He hath given them up to hardness of heart and blindness of mind, and, by the rage of their own passions, mutually to execute on themselves the vengeance of an injured Lord.—In all this the enemies of pure religion mean not so, neither do they think so, but it is in their heart to destroy the faith of our Lord Jesus Christ, and bring his people every where to shame.

While there appears, in multitudes, this sixed opposition to the cause of Christ, it is very manisest that his true friends are more animated and persevering than formerly; and, perhaps, there are no better means for increasing the flame of Christian love still higher, than such a periodical history of the state of religion, in our own churches, and through the world as will be attempted in this work. It is a natural means, for warning the hearts of Christians; to fee the love of their brethren in the cause of Christ, and their humble zeaj for the falvation of fouls. It is hoped that, by these endeavours, the servor and communional zeal of Christian piety may be increased—that the missionary interests, among new and scattered settlements of thofe born from Christian parents, and among the Heathen, may be promoted—and that a monthly history of the American . church and of the victories of divine grace in this land, may increase the love and comsort of our

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