Inquiry into the origin and course of Political Parties

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Page 381 - ... peace, commerce, and honest friendship with all nations, entangling alliances with none: the support of the State governments in all their rights, as the most competent administrations for our domestic concerns, and the surest bulwarks against anti-republican tendencies: the preservation of the general government in its whole constitutional vigor, as the sheet anchor of our peace at home, and safety abroad...
Page 276 - The judiciary, on the contrary, has no influence over either the sword or the purse ; no direction either of the strength or of the wealth of the society; and can take no active resolution whatever. It may truly be said to have neither force nor will, but merely judgment ; and must ultimately depend upon the aid of the executive arm even for the efficacy of its judgments.
Page 327 - The opinion of the judges has no more authority over congress than the opinion of congress has over the judges, and on that point the president is independent of both.
Page 44 - States; to devise such further provisions as shall appear to them necessary to render the constitution of the Federal Government adequate to the exigencies of the Union...
Page 41 - The late rebellion in Massachusetts has given more alarm, than I think it should have done. Calculate that one rebellion in...
Page 276 - The executive not only dispenses the honors, but holds the sword of the community ; the legislature not only commands the purse, but prescribes the rules by which the duties and rights of every citizen are to be regulated...
Page 133 - All charges of war, and all other expenses that shall be incurred for the common defence or general welfare, and allowed by the United States in Congress assembled, shall be defrayed out of a common treasury...
Page 380 - Equal and exact justice to all men, of whatever state or persuasion, religious or political; peace, commerce, and honest friendship with all nations, entangling alliances with none; the support of the State governments in all their rights, as the most competent administrations for our domestic concerns and the surest bulwarks against antirepublican tendencies; the preservation of the General Government in its whole constitutional vigor, as the sheet anchor of our peace at home and safety abroad...
Page 332 - No political truth is certainly of greater intrinsic value, or is stamped with the authority of more enlightened patrons of liberty than that on which the objection is founded. The accumulation of all powers, legislative, executive, and judiciary, in the same hands, whether or one, a few, or many, and whether hereditary, self-appointed, or elective, may justly be pronounced the very definition of tyranny.
Page 349 - I know no safe depository of the ultimate powers of the society but the people themselves; and if we think them not enlightened enough to exercise THEIR CONTROL WITH A WHOLESOME DISCRETION, THE REMEDY IS NOT TO TAKE IT FROM THEM, BUT TO INFORM THEIR DISCRETION BY EDUCATION.

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