Edmund Burke and the Discourse of Virtue

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University of Alabama Press, 1993 - Biography & Autobiography - 143 pages
Edmund Burke (1729-1797) continues to command a major presence in the history and criticism of Western thought. A great deal of attention, accordingly, is paid to the philosophical and literary qualities of his writings. Such emphases, however, overlook what Browne argues to be Burke's most important legacy: his choice to engage principles through the media of public life. This achievement is illustrated by Burke's concern for virtue as a principle of civic action and responsibility.

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Contents

Reading Virtue and Rhetorical Portraiture in
27
Enacting Rhetorical Judgment in
45
Staging Public Virtue in the Impeachment
83
Political Virtue as Rhetorical Action in
99
Notes
127
Index
141
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