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think this medicine has been often useful, and that it rather relieves the feverish heats, and the great irritability, than the general debility.

• Much has been said of late in praise of myrrh in pulmopary complaints, both in its simple itate, and when combined with sal martis, alcaline and neutral falts, &c. I have given it in every form, and sometimes with success. But in cases where the pulmonary hectic is confirmed, I have not seen it produce any relief. In this fever, I believe tonics of all de. Scriptions will be found to increase the symptoms, as they do in all cafes of inflammation. As I contend that there is no such

power in medicine as is understood by the terms balsamic and pectoral, in their usual acceptation, I consider this gum, with its accessaries, as acting by its tonic power upon the stomach and firit passages, and where such remedies are indicated, I have found it a valuable medicine. In great weakness and languor, where it is thought advisable to attempt relief in this way, I would recommend an infusion of the myrrh in fimple aqua calcis. The particles of the calx uniting with the fixed air in the gum, render the solution more perfect than any other menftruum I have tried. The tincture, when filtered, will fit light on the stomach, and may be combined with any thing that is thought proper,'

The diet alio is more carefully and exactly regulated than in the former edition; and, as it now stands, is a more clear as well as a more accurate system, than we have yet met with on the subject: we are satisfied, from much experience, that it is exceedingly well adapted to consumptions.

As that part of the former edition which was taken from Dr. Stark's manuscript, has been the occasion of some convere sation since the publication of the Medical Communications, and as we have conveyed Dr. Reid's first apology to the public, it becomes necessary to give his reasons at full length for not quoting the manuscript more distinctly: they appear to us yery satisfactory.

• When I was preparing the first edition of this work for the press, not being well acquainted with book-making, I was at a loss how to distinguish an extract, or racher abitract (not be ing either verbatim or in the arrangement of the original) taken from a MS, not known, nor, as I had been informed, intended to be known to the public. On consulting with a medical friend, we agreed that the name at the bottom of the page would fully point out whence it was taken. But though it did so in general, and was noticed as such by the author of the Med. Journal for Dec. 1783, yet in strict propriety it should have been marked with commas as it now is. Thirteen

years had elapsed from my first seeing the MS. and in that time I had more than once heard it mentioned by the present editor, that as some part of the MSS. had been lost, he understood the remainder was not to be published; it did not therefore occur to

me 2ino.

bour might be misapplied. By connecting the itories of Marią and Mit Hanipden so intimately, the author has raised.contending interests, which weaken the induence of each, and the catastrophe of the former's history is too near that of the latter. At the ium uit too of Maria's distress, her friend is relieved by a fortunate ecclaircissement; so that the mind hangs in doubt whether it houid rejoice or grieve

Miss B. will not misinterpret these hints: they are dictated rather by a desire to improve, than to depreciate her talents. She, at present, soars beyond many writers of this class; and, with a little care, may follow the first with no little fuccefs. The Omen; or, Memoirs of Sir Henry Melille and Miss Julia Eaf

brook. A Novel. Two Volumes. i 2mo. 6s. Lowndes.

Neither the design nor the execution of this novel is very happy. Many improbabilities occur in both; and we are not secompensed by the brilliancy of wit, justness of remark, well drawn characters, or interesting situations. But, while we have little to praise, we have nothing very particularly to condemn: a rash promise draws cown misfortunes on her who makes it; yet, as the conclusion is happy, we are apt to forget the punishment in the subsequent seward, and do not perceive with sufficient force the folly and impropriety of the conduct, Arenstatic Spy; or, Excurfions with an Air Balloon. Tato Vols.

6s. Symonds. This little work is superior to many attempts of the same kind. It contains some amusing adventures, juft reflections, and well drawn characters : it is not even deficient in its philofophical observations, if we except a sanguine partiality for aerial machines, and too great expectations of their utility We recognile, at times, some living characters ; and vice and fol. ly are held up to the infamy which they deserve. We do not however find any thing to grossly personal, as to deserve repre, henfion.

M E DI CAL. An Elay on the Nature ani Cure of the Pthisis Pulmonalis. Second

Edition, enlarged. By, Thomas Reid, M.D. F.R.S. 8vo. Śs. Cadell.

In the 16ch page of our Fifty-fifth Volume we gave a pretty çarly and full account of the first edition of this work; and we have since had more than one occasion to mention it. We shall now only remark, that it is greatly enlarged and much improved; but he foundation is nearly the same. Dr. Reid mentions our remarks on the emetic tastar, with a Hattering compliment; but we have already, in the account of his first edition, al. Jowed that the ipecacuanha is preferable for frequent use; and, since that period, have almost exclusively employed it, except where it failed to act as an enetic. We shall extract what he obferves relating to myrrh, which is now firft published. We 9

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think this medicine has been often useful, and that it rather relieves the feverith heats, and the great irritability, than the general debility.

• Much has been said of late in praise of myrrh in pulmo. pary complaints, both in its simple state, and when combined with sal martis, alcaline and neutral falts, &c. I have given it in every form, and sometimes with success. But in cases where the pulmonary hectic is confirmed, I have not seen it produce any relief. In this fever, I believe tonics of all de. fcriptions will be found to increase the symptoms, as they do in all cases of inflammation. As I contend that there is no fuch power

in medicine as is understood by the terms balsamic and pectoral, in their usual acceptation, I consider this gum, with its accessaries, as acting by its tonic power upon the sto. mach and first passages, and where such remedies are indicated, I have found it a valuable medicine. In great weakness and languor, where it is thought advisable to attempt relief in this way, I would recommend an infusion of the myrrh in fimple aqua calcis. The particles of the calx uniting with the fixed air in ihe gum, render the solution more perfect than any other menftruum I have tried. The tincture, when filtered, 'will fit . light on the stomach, and may be combined with any thing that is thought proper,'

The diet alío is more carefully and exactly regulated than in the former edition; and, as it now stands, is a more clear as well as a more accurate system, than we have yet met with on the subject : we are satisfied, from much experience, that it is exceedingly well adapted to consumptions.

As that part of the former edition which was taken from Dr. Stark's manuscript, has been the occasion of some converfation since the publication of the Medical Communications, and as we have conveyed Dr. Reid's first apology to the public, it becomes necessary to give his reasons at full length for not quoting the manuscript more distinctly: they appear to us yery fatisfactory.

• When I was preparing the first edition of this work for the press, not being well acquainted with book-making, I was at a loss how to distinguish an extract, or racher abitract (not be ing either verbatim or in the arrangement of the original) taken from a MS. not known, nor, as I had been informed, intended to be known to the public. On consulting with a me. dical friend, we agreed that the name at the bottom of the page would fully point out whence it was taken. But though it did so in general, and was noticed as such by the author of the Med. Journal for Dec. 1783, yet in strict propriety it should have been marked with commas as it now is. had elapsed from my first seeing the MS, and in that time I had more than once heard it mentioned by the present editor, that as some part of the MSS. had been loft, he understood the remainder was not to be published; it did not therefore occur to

Thirteen years

me

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me as necessary to consult any person on the subject. Had I given a description of tubercles froin my own notes of dissections, it would have so nearly resembled this in the leading points, that I thought it snore candid to make the extract. But the nature of my work required that what related to the subject should be compressed, the language corrected, and some difference made in the arrangement; though the sense will be found in my opinion) carefully preserved, and nothing material omitted. 'In so doing have I injured the memory of Dr. Stark? On the contrary, it has been the cause of publishing part of his MSS. after lying fifteen years in the editor's hands, and but for this would probably never have seen the light; and consequently his work would have been deprived of that reputation it, so juitly nerits.

• This plain recital of facts is meant as an answer to what Dr. Car. Smych has said upon the subject in his introduction to Dr. Stark's MSS. in the Med. Commen, and I must rely upon tbe candour of the reader to believe, that if I have erred, it was not intentionally.'

To this edition is added an appendix on the use and effects of frequent vomits. It contains an hiflorical detail of the practice, seemingly executed with accuracy and attention. The remarkable Effects of Fixed Air in Mortifications of the Extremi

ties. To which is added, the Hipory of some Worm-cafes. By John Harrison, Surgeon. Svo. Baker and Galabin.

The effects of this remedy were experienced only by two patients, and these were far advanced in life; but the fermenting poultices were remarkably-fuccefsiul. In the first too, the complaint seemed not to be merely local; though, when the fixed air was employed, the general disease was much diminished, if not entirely removed: in the last, the 'mortification was more certainly local,

The Worm-cases are only added to recommend a secret remedy. This conduct is unworthy of a man who practises a liberal profefion; nor will the conduct of Dr. James affist him. He who shrinks from a trial, is frequently conscious that he cannot support it with credit. The Medical Family Infirucior. By C. Hall, M. D. 8vo. 2s.6d.

Stockdale. The greatest part of this work is compiled from the obfervations of Dr. Fothergill and Hunter. "Some others of inferior note bave contributed their fares; and the whole is in. tended as a family companion. As a compendium of this kind it is evidently defective, both in the number of diseases described, and the directions for relieving them. The errors are not very numerous, as the compiler has generally been guided þy good authorities; but, when he advises vinegar in inflammations of the tendons, to dissolve the 'terra alba,' or the bark in doses of a drachmn, we smile at his credulity, and wonder at the resolution of his patients.

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The principal object of our author was, he observes, the hydrophobia ; but he has added so little to the remarks of Dr. Fothergill, that we cannot perceive any advantage likely to accrue from it to the public-or to himself. An experimental Enquiry into the Nature and Qualities of the Chel

tenham Water. By A. Fothergill, M. D. F. R. S. 8vo. 6d. Johnson.

As the ingenious author does not offer his analysis to the public as complete, we shall not mention some defects in the che. mical

part of his work. Dr. Fothergill aims rather to examine this water as a physician; and enough is diftinctly ascertained, to direct an intelligent practitioner.

• From the preceding experiments, a gallon of the water (wine measure) appears to contain the subsequent principles, and nearly in the following proportions, viz. Native Glauber salt combined with a por

tion of Epsom salt, Sea salt

5 grains. Iron combined with fixed air

5 Magnesia combined with fixed air

25 Calcarious earth or selenite Fixed air combined with a portion of phlogisticated air,

24 ounce measures. • To these may perhaps be added a small portion of hepatic gas.'

The principal doubt arises on the subject of Glauber's falt. There is great reason to think, that the neutral salt is wholly of the earthy kind, with magnesia or calcareous earth for its bar fis; for these minute points are not properly examined. If we fuppose an alkali to be the basis of some part of the neutral, we must, to account for the superior solubility of the salt, suppose also the acid to be phlogisticated. The last opinion will gain additional force from some ottor appearances; but, in whatever state the acid may be, the probability of the existence of an al. kali is not great.

Dr. Fothergill next examines the medical use of the water, from all its different ingredients. This is a method which we hall not follow, because it is very doubtful. The chief effects are slightly laxative and diuretic from the falts, together with a light stimulus on the stomach from the fixed air. The waters must be serviceable in visceral obitructions and cutaneous complaints: we should suppose them too laxative for consumptive cases. The iron and the hepatic vapour can do very little ser. vice, or injury.

We wish for a more accurate analysis of all the mineral waters of Great Britain, as much as Dr. Fothergill; but we should also wish, that this analysis should be more extensive and clear, than those which we have lately received from fome English chemifts. Very considerable additions have been made to the

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